Capital Float secures $13 million in funding to give loans to small businesses – YourStory

Written by Jubin Mehta

Capital Float is a digital finance company that provides working capital loans to underserved small business in India via a technology-led loan origination and credit underwriting platform. The Bangalore based company today announced that it has raised $13 Million in Series A financing to support the company’s rapid growth. The round was led by SAIF Partners and Sequoia Capital, with participation from existing investor Aspada.

Founded in 2013, Capital Float has created a proprietary technology platform to evaluate the financial health of SMEs and efficiently deliver working capital to a segment that is underserved by traditional banks. Businesses can apply online and get funds in less than 7 days (see how it works). The company currently lends to e-commerce merchants, small manufacturers, and B2B service providers across major cities. The company has been founded by Stanford MBAs Sashank Rishyasringa and Gaurav Hinduja and is a registered Non-Banking Finance Company (NBFC). Along with the headquarter in Bangalore, Capital Float has offices in New Delhi and Mumbai.

To date, the Capital Float platform has delivered nearly Rs. 40 Crore in loans to SMEs across 10+ cities in India. The company claims to have achieved record results in 2014 and saw a 10x increase in online applications, particularly in the e-commerce market where it has partnered with leading marketplaces such as Snapdeal, Flipkart, Amazon, PayTM and Myntra to finance small merchants selling online.

This round of funding will help expand Capital Float’s technology, enabling it to scale up nationally and launch new loan products. The company had raised a $4 Million seed round in mid-2014 from Aspada and SAIF, bringing the total capital raised thus far to Rs. 100 Crore in this fiscal.

“We started Capital Float with the belief that technology and data would be the key drivers in cracking SME financing in India,” said co-founders Gaurav Hinduja and Sashank Rishyasringa. “Over the past year, we’ve focused on building the platform to deliver what our customers want above all else – flexible and ultra-convenient access to finance that can scale with their business. By leveraging alternative data in our underwriting model, we are increasingly able to not only make faster decisions but also lend to emerging business models. We are very excited to partner with SAIF, Sequoia, and Aspada, and truly believe that we now have a world-class set of investors to propel us towards this vision.”

News piece sourced from YourStory. Read the full piece here

More Related Posts

Card image cap
Changes in the GST Taxation System – with effect from 15 November 2017

Composition Scheme Changes

  • GST rate at 1% for manufacturers and traders
  • Composition scheme limit to be extended to ₹1.5 crore
  • Composition tax of 1% on turnover of taxable goods
  • Interstate sales are not permissible for composition dealers. Input tax benefit not allowed.

GST Filing Extensions

GSTR form Previous Due Date Revised Due Date
GSTR-5 (for Non-Residents) Before 20th August 2017 or & days from date of registration 15th December 2017
GSTR-4 (for Composition Dealers) 18th October 2017 24th December 2017
GSTR-6 (for Input Service Distributors) 13th August 2017 31st December 2017
ITC-04 (for the quarter of July-September) 25th October 2017 31st December 2017
TRAN-1 30th September 2017 31st December 2017

Taxpayer Relief Measures

  • Reduced Late Fee: For delay in the filing of NIL returns, late fee will be reduced from ₹200 per day to ₹20 per day.
  • Credit of Late Fee: For filing of GSTR-3B for the months of July, August and September, late fee has been waived. Any late fee paid will be credited back in Electronic Cash Ledger under ‘Tax’ and can be utilized for GST payments.
  • Manual filing for ‘Advance Ruling’ to be introduced
  • Export of services to Nepal and Bhutan are now exempt from GST. Input tax credit, if paid, can be claimed for refund.
  • Taxpayers with turnover less than ₹1 crore should file invoices every month, while those with turnover greater than ₹1 crore should file invoices every quarter.

Revised GST Rates for 178 Goods and Services

Goods/Services Present GST Rates Revised GST Rates
Guar meal, Khandsari sugar, Dried or frozen vegetables, Uranium ore concentrate, Hop cones, Unworked coconut shells 5% Nil
Desiccated coconut, Idli Dosa Batter, Coir products, Fly ash bricks, Worn clothes or rags, Fishing hooks, Leather or chamois after tanning or crusting, Nets of textile material, Restaurants (non-Ac) 12% 5%
Potato flour, Chutney powder, Sulphur recovered as by-product in refining of crude oil, Specified parts of aircraft, Scientific and technical apparatus, Computer software and accessories, Restaurants (AC) 18% 5%
Condensed milk, Diabetic foods, Refined sugar, Medicinal grade oxygen, Printing, writing and drawing inks, Pasta, Curry paste, Mayonnaise and salad dressings, Mixed seasoning, Parts of agricultural & sewing machinery, Bamboo and cane furniture, Frames and mountings for spectacles, Hand bags and shopping bags of cotton and jute 18% 12%
Wet grinders, Tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles 28% 12%
Chewing gum, Chocolates, Preparation of facial make-up, Preparations for oral hygiene, Toothpaste, Shaving and after-shave items, Shampoo, Deodorants, Detergents, Granite and marble, Handmade furniture, Electric switches, Watches, Sanitary ware, Cases, Cutlery, Refrigerators, Flavoured drinks, Water heaters, Fire extinguishers, Printers, Automatic goods vending machine, Transmission shafts and cranks, Fork-lift trucks, Self-propelled bulldozers, Batteries, Static converters, Vacuum cleaners, Cameras and projectors, Microscopes, Musical instruments 28% 18%

[maxbutton id=”4″ url=”https://safe.capitalfloat.com/cf/default/register?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=button&utm_campaign=blog-content-button&utm_content=changes-gst-taxation-system-effect-15-november-2017″ text=”I want Business Loan” ]

Oct 24, 2018

Card image cap
A digital prescription for the pharma industry

Pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself our because it is pain, but because occasionally can procure great pleasure.

Oct 24, 2018

Card image cap
How will the GST Impact Financial Services Sector in India?

The Goods and Services Tax (GST) has been the biggest tax reform in India since 1947. Analysts also expect that it will have a huge impact on various sectors of the Indian economy, especially the service sector. Of the segment comprising banks and non-banking financial companies (NBFCs), the fund-related, fee-based and insurance services will witness significant impact as a result of GST implementation and will see shifts from the way they had been operating earlier.

What is really implied by financial services?

The term ‘financial services’ has not been specifically defined by the GST law. However, to understand the implications of this tax on the financial services sector, we need to consider the supply of goods and services that involve the extension of credit support. These services include but are not limited to:

– Loans
– Lease
– Hire purchase
– Conditional sales
– Securitisation or assignment of receivables
– Acquisition or sale of shares and securities

The compliance towards GST can take some effort in the above fields because of the nature of operations conducted by banks and NBFCs concerning credit products, lease transactions, hire purchase, actionable claims and other funds and non-funds-based services.

The GST rate on banking services and services provided by the NBFCs has been raised from 15% to 18% with the execution of this reform from July 01, 2017 onwards. The GST impact on financial services may further be classified into the following sub-sections:

1. Network of branches to be registered separately

Before the implementation of GST, a bank or NBFC with operations spread across India could discharge its compliance on service tax through one ‘centralised’ registration. After GST regulation, these institutions will be required to get a separate tax registration for each of the states they work in.

As a destination-based tax, GST has a multi-stage collection system. In such a mechanism, the tax is collected at each stage and the credit of tax that was paid at the last stage is available as a set off at the subsequent stage of the transaction. This transfers the tax incidence to different entities more evenly, and helps the industry through improved cash flows and better working capital management.

2. Leveraged and de-leveraged Input Tax Credit 

Earlier, banks and NBFCs had been majorly opting for the reversal of 50% of the Central Value Added Tax (CENVAT) credit that they avail against the inputs and input services, while the CENVAT credit on the capital goods was given without any reversal conditions. Under GST, the 50% of the CENVAT credit that was availed for inputs, input services and capital goods has been reversed. This leaves banks and NBFCs with a decreased credit of 50% on capital goods, and in turn raises the cost of capital.

However, this can be counterbalanced by the advantages posed by operating one’s business in the new taxation scenario. A unified domestic market can help with more opportunities for expansion and reduced production costs enhancing one’s profitability.

3. Evaluation and adjudication 

The impact of GST on banking services and NBFCs will also be felt in terms of evaluation procedures. Service tax was assessed by the particular regulators in the state where a branch is registered. In addition, every registered branch of the concerned bank or NBFC had to validate its position for the chargeability in the respective state and provide a reason for utilising the input tax credit in various states.

The GST assessment will involve more than one assessing authority, and each of them may have a different judgement for the same underlying issue. Although such contradictions can prolong the decision-making process for the financial institutions, the adverse effects of evaluation by one authority can be offset through decisions made by another assessor.

Impact of GST on banking sector – General services 

Banks in India have been levying service tax on most transactions enabled by their systems. These include but are not limited to digital fund transfers, issuance of ATM cards and chequebooks, and ATM withdrawals beyond a specific limit. With GST on financial services, these services will be taxed at the rate of 18% instead of the 15% service tax rate that was being charged earlier. For example, if you withdraw money from an ATM other than your bank’s ATM after exceeding the “free transaction limit”, you are typically charged Rs 20 plus a service tax, which comes to around Rs 23. With the imposition of GST, this amount will go up to Rs 23.60.

However, deeper analysis reveals that such an increase in cost should not be considered a negative GST impact on financial services sector. In the long run, banks will be able to transfer the advantage of input tax credit – enabled under GST – to the customers. Furthermore, services like fixed deposits (FDs) and other bank account deposits that were outside the circle of service tax will continue to remain outside the GST ambit.

A major advantage of GST on financial services and other sectors is that it is a transparent tax and has reduced the number of indirect taxes. It integrates different taxes and ensures that the tax burden is fairly divided between different entities involved in the system. In addition, GST is essentially technology based. The advanced software systems used in its calculation and filing works will reduce the chances of manual errors and will lead to better decision making.

Capital Float too experiences the effect of GST on banking and NBFCs. We find ourselves in the 18% tax bracket, and we maintain our statutory lending policies including low-interest rates and quick disbursement of funds. Taking into account the GST impact on financial services sector, Capital Float will continue to provide the best credit solutions to its clients, customized to adapt to the changes brought by GST on SMEs in various sectors.

Oct 24, 2018