What is Capital Float’s Pay Later?

Business owners frequently face working capital challenges. Supplier payments are a constant concern for SMEs. In manufacturing, trading and services, where lead times are significantly high, businessmen often finance operations by resorting to informal channels of credit. Traders who deal with shorter sales cycles tend to miss out on large orders as they are unable to pay their suppliers large sums of money to make bookings.

Capital Float’s Pay Later works exceptionally well in these cases. Pay Later carries a pre- defined credit facility which is unique to each applicant depending on various factors, for instance, industry the applicant operates in, scale of the applicant’s business and some basic financial metrics. You can make multiple drawdowns from the assigned balance and pay interest only on amounts utilized. By repaying the amount used, you reset the balance for further usage, making Pay Later a flexible, rolling loan product.

For example, if you’ve been provided a credit facility of Rs 1 lakh, you can make up to 4 drawdowns of Rs 25,000 each. Upon your first drawdown, you have a balance of Rs 75,000. You will be charged interest on the drawdown (Rs 25,000) and not the entire amount (Rs 1,00,000). By repaying the amount used, your balance will be restored to Rs 1,00,000.

With Capital Float’s convenient mobile app, you can use this zero-collateral loan product from absolutely anywhere. To make payments, all you need to do is take a photograph of the invoice with your mobile phone and upload it using our app. The vendor is paid on your behalf within 24 hours of the upload.

Features

Pay Later is an incredibly fast and paperless access to credit that works along the similar lines of a credit card. The functionality of this product as the name suggests – use the facility now and simply pay later. Following are the salient features of the product:

1. Get credit of up to Rs. 25 Lacs

With Pay Later, you are eligible for credit of up to Rs. 25 Lacs, which ensures that you’re never short of funds.

2. Easy, hassle-free online application procedure

The entire procedure will take just 10 minutes of your time. To get started, you can sign-up on Capital Float using your desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone. Fill a simple online application form and submit the requested documentation to conclude the process.

3. Get approved in 3 days

Where traditional financial institutions take up to 8-12 weeks, we assess your eligibility and offer you a customized credit amount within 72 hours.

4. Convenient repayment at the end of 30/60/90-day loan term

Pay Later offers three flexible repayment plans that work in accordance to your business cash flows. You can choose to repay loan amounts at the end of 30/60/90 days from the date the loan is utilized. This way, you’re never bogged down by hefty monthly instalments.

5. Pay distributors/suppliers via Capital Float’s convenient mobile app

Make payments with just a few taps on your smartphone via our mobile app that you can download for free from Play Store and App Store. The payment is confirmed instantly, and reaches the vendor’s account in less than 24 hours.

Benefits

1. Zero-Collateral

Pay Later is a collateral-free loan product, which means you don’t need to pledge your property or assets to avail the loan. Your credit amount is determined by the potential and profitability of your business.

2. Flexibility in drawdowns:

Pay Later allows you to use a portion of the total amount any time you wish to. For instance, if you have a credit facility of Rs. 10 lakhs, then you can utilise the full amount or a fraction of it at any given time, depending upon your requirement. The user-friendly mobile app efficiently keeps track of your balance, so that you can manage repayments accordingly. You can also draw amounts as low as 25,000 rupees, hence making this product extremely convenient to use.

3. Interest applicable only upon drawdown

You’re required to pay interest only for the amount you’ve utilised and not on the entire credit amount assigned to you.

Click here to read about the features and benefits in more detail.

Eligibility and Documents

The eligibility criteria for Pay Later is extremely simple. All you need is a small list of documents at the time of application:

Eligibility

  • Applicant’s business to have at least 2 years of vintage
  • Applicant must purchase from a reputed supplier
  • Applicant must have 3 months of transaction data with the supplier

Documents required

  • Audited financials for the last 2 years
  • VAT returns and bank documents for the last 6 months
  • KYC documents of the applicant as well as the organisation

How to Apply

Applying for credit via Pay Later involves a simple four-step procedure. As long as you have a computer or smartphone and a good internet connection, you can apply from anywhere. Here are the steps involved:

  1. Apply & get empaneled

Sign up on Capital Float’s website to kick-start the procedure. Fill out the form with your personal and professional details, and click on submit.

      2. Upload the necessary documents

The next step involves uploading the requested documents. This includes business vintage of two years along with some basic KYC documents.

     3. Receive instant approval

Receive approval on your application within hours. In less than 3 days from the time of application, your credit facility will be set up for your use.

    4. Credit facility ready for use

Once your credit amount is determined, you can start using Capital Float’s mobile app to create tranches by uploading invoices and making vendor payments.

Fees and Charges

At Capital Float, we conduct business in the most transparent manner possible. Therefore, you’re only obligated to pay a processing fee of up to 2% for the loan. Rest assured, there are no hidden or pre-closure charges that pop-up during or after your application procedure.

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Top 10 Reasons Why Private Schools Take Loans

To provide quality education, private schools in India must have cutting-edge infrastructure and well-planned facilities. This is even more important now because the generation currently in schools is growing in an environment of mobile computing devices and e-commerce. Since private institutions are entirely dependent on their own earnings to improve their campus, they may need school loans to finance such expenses.

Let us look at the top reasons that drive schools towards taking loans from banks and NBFCs:

1. To construct a new school building

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Loan for construction of school building is commonly sought by institutions that are successfully providing education services but need more classrooms to accommodate the increasing number of students. Adding more sections for each grade is also a good idea when schools are focused on keeping a low student:teacher ratio.

2. To build a playground/sports court

school_sports_playground

School loans may also be required to add a playground, basketball courts, tennis courts or rooms for indoor sports. Games are an essential part of school education, and if a small unsecured loan from an institutional lender can help to build a beautiful playing field, the investment is worthwhile.

3. To develop a laboratory

school_laboratory

Schools need to have well-equipped labs for practical experiments concerning physics, chemistry, biology and to give students hands-on experience with computer studies. Some private schools are also required to have Home Science labs as per the curriculum for their students. A quick loan for school laboratory can be procured at easy terms from a FinTech lending company. Such lenders usually provide up to Rs 50 lakhs on loan for building school laboratory.

4. To buy furniture for classrooms, staffroom

school_furniture

A simple reason to apply for a loan could be the purchase of new or additional furniture for students and staff. The cost of ergonomic desks and chairs may not be within the budget of the school, and financial support from a FinTech company can come in handy.

5. To purchase commercial vehicles

commercial_vehicle_school_bus

Schools that provide transportation services to their students and staff may need to buy new buses or vans. If adequate finance is not available for such purchases, FinTech lenders can offer simple digital modes to provide unsecured loans with flexible repayment options.

6. To build or improve a library

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Well-stocked libraries are essential components of any school’s infrastructure. A school that has been running successfully for some time, but does not have a library, can borrow funds from school loan companies to build a quality library on its campus. Unsecured school loans can also be taken to buy stocks of new books that are too expensive to purchase in the available library budget.

7. To start a new facility on premises – stationery/canteen/uniform shop

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Private schools try to offer all the essential facilities for the convenience of students. If there is a stationery unit on the campus, students can purchase prescribed textbooks and other essential items without having to visit markets. A shop for summer and winter uniforms makes it easy to buy the exact uniform as required by the school. While canteens are not “must-haves”, they are good to provide hygienic menu options to the students and staff. School loans may be taken to fund such facilities.

8. For repairs and renovation

school_construction

A school that already has structures or facilities for education and sports may also need a loan to repair, renovate and improve them. It can digitally apply for such funds on a FinTech company’s website.

9. To purchase new teaching devices, audio-visual equipment

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School loans fund the purchase of interactive teaching devices that are becoming increasingly important in the digital age. Educational institutions can borrow to install whiteboards, overhead projectors and other audio-visual teaching aids to make learning more interesting for their students.

10. To add/improve day-boarding facilities

Some private schools offer day-boarding amenities to their students. As a part of this facility, they need to provide healthy meals and areas for rest and recreation. To build and improve such environment, they may need loans that are offered most conveniently from FinTech companies.

As a leading digital NBFC offering loans to educational institutions, Capital Float funds all such requirements of schools in India. To know more about our financing products, feel free to call us on 1860 419 0999.

Apply for Unsecured school loan

Oct 24, 2018

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Why Fintech Lenders are the Best Option to Avail Business Finance

Many start-ups are launched, propelled by a brilliant idea, but often face tough times due to inadequate funds. The first impulse is to turn to banks, which, however, usually refuse requests for a loan for business without security. They also ask for plenty of documents to corroborate the need for the grant and the purpose that it will be used for.

A parallel source of finance for small businesses come in the form of non-banking financial companies (NBFCs). Traditional NBFCs offer loans on terms similar to banks, but they do not hold a banking license. In addition, unlike banks, they cannot accept deposits from public. Other than loans and credit facilities, they can offer retirement planning schemes, money market instruments and underwriting activities.

While small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have been turning to banks and NBFCs to get loans, the long-drawn process from application submission to disbursal of funds is still a deterrent for many. After the financial crisis of 2008, there was an even greater need for reliable sources of business finance. Interestingly, the digital technology that gave rise to online banking and e-commerce was also progressing at a fast pace in the same period. This helped to create a new segment of NBFCs in the form of financial technology, known as FinTech companies.

With the aid of complex analytic tools, FinTech companies evaluate credit risk by using an array of customer data, including their digital footprint on social media, e-commerce platforms, smartphone usage and geo-location.

How are business loans by FinTech lenders more convenient than traditional loans for borrowers?

Conventional NBFCs do not usually have a human-centric approach to lending. The lengthy and cumbersome process of applying for business finance that requires piles of physical documents tires out borrowers. Young entrepreneurs who are eager to expand their operations and are confident about returns on their investment cannot afford to wait for long. Also, delays in work can also harm their long-term business interests. They need an alternative source of funds that can cater to their needs more actively.

What draws the digitally perceptive entrepreneurs to a FinTech company is its ability to offer quick loans at competitive rates of interest. Such companies have a holistic approach towards risk assessment and do not ask for heaps of paper-based documents before they start considering an approval for the loan. The basic files needed to check the creditworthiness of the borrower can be uploaded on the encrypted portals of FinTechs.

The advanced machine learning algorithms that these lending platforms employ read through information such as the net earnings of a business, the educational and professional qualification of its owners, the location from which the business operates and the returns on investment that it drew in the past one year. In comparison to this, a traditional NBFC loan is issued to companies that have been in business for at least 3 to 4 years.

Summarily, the prime reasons for which business borrowers prefer FinTech platforms are:

Simplified application process – Instead of visiting a branch in person, they can apply for the business loans from anywhere and at anytime. As the process is digital, all they need is a reliable Internet connection and the soft copies of minimal documents.

Swift funding – Unlike conventional NBFC loans, the funds from a FinTech corporation do not take long to be approved and disbursed.

No prepayment penalties – To make up for their loss on interest due to early pay-off on the loan, banks as well as most NBFCs charge a percentage of the loan amount as penalty. This is not the case with new-age technology based lending organisations. If a borrower can afford to make complete payment on the loan earlier than its stipulated tenure, there are no extra charges.

No hidden charges – You may on occasions have felt surprised when a bank or NBFC told you that there would be a payment protection “insurance premium” charged on your business loan. In the traditional lending sector, such charges are normal. The lending institutions claim that these help in protecting the monthly loan instalments in case sudden sickness or an accident prevents you from making payments on the loan. FinTech organisations do not include such clauses in their agreements. The funds are granted for business expenses in the short term and are approved based on the ability of the borrower to pay back.

The ability of FinTech firms to trawl the online portals and gather data relevant to the borrower’s paying capacity helps in affording more growth opportunities to start-ups. Many SMEs in India have reasonably strong business models, but they still cannot manage to get funds from banks and traditional NBFCs. This shift towards technology-backed alternatives has been favourable for promising ventures.

At the same time, the conventional lending institutions should also understand that FinTech companies are not a threat to their existence. Both these sectors can collaborate with each other in areas such as customer acquisition, product innovation, analytics, sales enablement and cyber security.

The access to innovation through digital peer-to-peer lenders allows NBFCs and banks to create competitive advantages for their own business.

Customer-centric innovation triggered by FinTechs is here to stay. The possibility of getting a loan for business without security or collateral is real. Open architecture-based wealth management tools, Big Data and online financial advice will continue to help entrepreneurs.

As a digital-age lender in this domain, Capital Float uses proprietary algorithms to inspect large amounts of data and evaluate a potential business borrower’s creditworthiness. We offer timely business finance without collateral to SMEs, start-ups, and freelancers to help them bear the expenses that are crucial for their stability and growth in the business world. Our process of judging the payment capacity of businesses is automated, fast and flexible, while also being diligent. If you need loans in less than a week and do not have a very long history in your industry, do not let any refusal from traditional NBFCs discourage you. Visit www.capitalfloat.com to find the business loan best suitable to you.

Oct 24, 2018

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The SME Lending Puzzle: Why Banks Fall Short

Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario:

ABC & Co., a small services firm, began operations in mid-2011. It reported a 40% jump in annual turnover from Rs. 5 Cr in FY 2012 to Rs. 7 Cr in FY 2013. As a startup, the company has not yet broken even and reported losses for consecutive years. The promoter is well educated, previously worked in organizations of repute for over a decade before deciding to float this venture. The short-term finance requirement of ABC & Co is about Rs. 40 lac for 90 days, but does not have any physical collateral to offer as security. At this stage, the promoter of ABC & Co. decides to approach banks and NBFCs in the market to fund this debt gap.

What would this promoter’s experience be in today’s scenario? Would he be successful in securing the necessary funds?

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According to a recent statistic, 33% of companies operating in the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises sector have access to banks and financial institutions, while the rest remain excluded and are compelled to raise money through informal channels.

This debt gap is alarming especially in the backdrop of the fact that SME segment contributes nearly 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product and 45% of all industrial output.

Till date, banks and NBFCs have not been able to finance this debt gap effectively. What has prevented or restricted them from profitably penetrating this sector? Is it due to inherent credit risk in the segment, lack of collateral, government regulation and laws, or simply because there are greener pastures elsewhere to lend money?

Lets us understand the debt requirement of the SME segment (both early-stage as well as mature entities) before we try to further dissect this issue. In our example, ABC & Co. could require financing for primarily two reasons:

1) Capex, i.e. medium to long-term finance for business expansion, product diversification, renovation of business premises, or purchase of machinery.

2) Working Capital i.e. to cover short-term immediate cash flow needs arising from day-to-day business operations.

To cater to this demand, banks and financial institutions already have specific products (both fund and non-fund based) that can be broadly categorized into two categories for the sake of simplicity:

1) Simple lending products, which would typically cater to the first requirement of SMEs for Capex. These are medium to long-term financing products in the form of equipment and machinery loans, high yield unsecured business loans, Loan against Property etc.

2) Specialised lending products, which typically include factoring, trade finance, cash management services, project finance, bank guarantee, or letters of credit, which typically cater to the second requirement of working capital finance.

As is evident from the above, it is not the lack of “products” that explains the under-penetration of finance flowing to the SME sector. Rather, it is in the design, applicability and administration of these products to the SME sector that banks have fallen short.

In an effort to go deeper, we can identify four key reasons among others, for this shortfall:

1)  Sole Focus on Financials: The current approach to SME lending in most institutions is still heavily dependent on business financials- i.e. looking at historical data to predict future creditworthiness. Typically this involves a lot of paper work and many visits to the applicant.

This approach has not been very successful in the SME sector to-date due to the fact that the financials provided by the applicant are often opaque given the cash nature of business transactions and incentives to under report income to save on taxes. ABC & Co., on this parameter alone (aside from business vintage) would be filtered out as the current financial position reflecting business losses would not be very appealing to most financiers.

2)  Bureau Reporting: There are two kinds of credit bureau reports that can be generated by member banks and NBFCs – Individual and Corporate. While individual records are provided by most bureaus, only CIBIL currently provides reports for corporate entities in India. Valid records for SME entities are still not very evolved in the country. And while the bureaus can provide data on credit worthiness of the individuals involved in any given company, they cannot give relevant insights about an applicant who is a first time borrower.

Since ABC & Co. is newly established, there would not be any bureau record on the company. The application would then have to be judged on the strength of the individual records for the promoter as well as the business viability of ABC & Co.

3)  Selective Segmentation: The implication of the above two factors is that only the “upper layer” of the medium to large enterprise segment is able to pass through banks’ and NBFCs’ credit assessment parameters, leaving aside the major chunk of “small” entrepreneurs and entities whose need for adequate finance is more pronounced. These small entities could be major links in the supply chains of large players, and their inability to access finance could have the ripple effects across the value chain.

4)  Lack of Collateral Security: Lending in India traditionally has relied on taking adequate collateral as a “risk mitigant” to cover the credit risks associated with SME lending and the ambiguity around appraising this segment. The Loan to Value ratio (LTV) becomes the yardstick to segregate and approve or reject cases based on risk. This ratio is inversely proportional to the risk perception of the applicant.

Since ABC & Co. does not have any physical collateral such as property or machinery to offer and the promoter has pitched in whatever money he had in the form of initial capital into the business, his application would be rejected by most banks and NBFCs in the market today.

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This problem of access to finance for SMEs in India is even more accentuated for early-stage companies or startups such as ABC & Co. In their case, past financial performance would be not a correct indicator of the future potential of the enterprise. After initial round of equity funding from family and friends or seed investors, working capital requirements or ad-hoc needs for short term finance would inevitably kick in and must be dealt with in a timely manner to keep the firm operational.

To conclude, traditional lending to the SME sector in India can best be described as a “One Size Fits All Approach.” The risk management techniques used by banks and other financial institutions today are invariably more suitable for medium and large corporate entities. The same set of rules when inadvertently applied to small and early-stage enterprises result in a faulty output, i.e. the systemic rejection of most SME loan applications like ABC & Co. Given the intense nature of competition in the lending industry today, the consequence is that too many banks and financial institutions end up chasing the same set of “good” customers, leaving aside a much larger untapped segment of SMEs in the process.

Watch this space for more articles on the subject as well as suggested ways to underwrite “small” and
“early-stage” entities in the SME sector.

(Image credit: http://blog.directcapital.com/misc/small-business-loan-video/) 

Oct 24, 2018