5 Common SME Financing Mistakes To Avoid

The SME (small and medium enterprises) sector is an important contributor to India’s economic growth. Even though their product or service may add great value for certain people, many SMEs face challenges. This is mostly because of the lack of research and planning by the business owners about the potential opportunities and risks of the particular niche in which these units operate. Many-a-times such businesses fail to make accurate assessments of their working capital requirements and, even when they do, cannot find ways to finance them.

Some common financing mistakes made by SMEs relate to whether or not to borrow, estimating the correct amount of SME business loan required, checking the full financing cost, the time wasted on getting a loan approved and the opportunity costs.

SME Financing Options and Some Common Mistakes

The Government and the private sector have taken several initiatives to increase availability of small business loans to SMEs in India. Despite the improved availability of SME finance, many units are still struggle with easy access to finance. This is mainly due to the lack of awareness of new-age, innovative financing solutions that are offered by FinTech lenders like Capital Float.

Here are the five most common financing mistakes made by SMEs:

1. Lack of Planning: One of the gravest shortcomings of smaller businesses is the inability to plan for the longer term. Business owners tend to get so involved with daily operations, troubleshooting and trying to complete orders that they fail to step back and look at the bigger picture. In the absence of a business plan, many SMEs do not foresee the amount of cash they would require to grow and expand. They suddenly find themselves in a severe cash crunch, unable to meet their working capital needs.

A sound business plan is essential for approaching a bank for a loan. Moreover, the ability to project a cash crunch or the funds needed to grow would allow SMEs to approach banks in time, since traditional lending institutions may take months before sanctioning the loan. This is where FinTech lenders have eased the situation. By deploying cutting-edge technology, Capital Float can ensure loan approval within hours. The use of powerful algorisms helps determine the prospects of a business, easing the process of loan approval. In fact, such lenders do not require a formal business plan for sanctioning SME finance.

2.Wrong Estimation of Funds Required: Most business owners feel anxious about overestimating their loan requirement and having to pay interest on excess funds. This makes them lean towards underestimating their costs. Thus, even when a loan is disbursed, these businesses are left wanting for more. Of course, the overestimation of the loan requirement hits the bottom-line.

What such businesses need is Capital Float’s Pay Later Finance product, which offers a Predetermined credit amount. While a credit amount is determined, based on the prospects of the business, the SME has the flexibility to transfer only as much funds, as it currently needs. Repayments can be made as the business generates money, and the repayment restores the credit amount, making funds available for future requirements.

3.Hidden Charges: Several lenders burden SMEs with hidden fees. These charges may be exorbitant and the business owner may not even know when they are levied. At Capital Float, perfect transparency is maintained, with no hidden charges. In fact, unlike most traditional banking institutions that impose a fee for the early repayment of a loan, there are no prepayment charges at Capital Float.

4.Choosing the Wrong SME Finance Product: Most SMEs turn toward unorganized moneylenders or traditional banking institutions to borrow money. These loans are not tailored to the specific needs of the SMEs. New-age lenders like Capital Float offer various SME business loans that have been designed keeping in mind the needs, business model and ability to repay of different businesses.

5.Trying to Arrange Collateral: SMEs sometimes put too much at stake to get a loan or do not borrow money in the absence of collateral. Capital Float offers small business loans in India without the requirement for collateral. One can also opt for a Merchant Cash Advance, which converts accounts receivables of a business to quick and usable funds.

Apart from these common mistakes made by small businesses, the timing of the loan approval and receipt of funds plays a critical role in the success of SMEs. Any delay in arranging the necessary funds can prove catastrophic for a business. This is mainly because SMEs often do not have sufficient negotiating power with their suppliers. They need to make payments for raw materials long before they can raise an invoice to their customers.

The rapid evolution of technology to address SME finance needs have revolutionized the lending space. The objective of FinTech lenders is to eliminate the liquidity issues faced by the SME sector by ensuring the quick approval and disbursal of the loan amount, while also making it easier for these smaller businesses to repay the loan. However, to make use of these advantages, SMEs need to be made aware of such options.

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Implications of GST on SMEs

One of the biggest tax revolutions of India is underway as businesses and tax payers are gearing up for the change. These enterprises and individuals are assessing how the GST rollout will make a difference to them. One such segment is the Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) segment, which contributes significantly to India’s GDP and exports. The positive effects from GST are expected to drive decentralization of opportunities and provide an impetus to India’s GDP. However there is some concern that some of its policy implications could slow down business, and that is what small and medium enterprises must prepare for. Gaining know-how on GST rules and implications is the first step towards becoming GST-compliant and becoming tax-savvy. This blog will help you understand which SMEs are eligible for GST and the impact on the sector as a whole.

How GST will impact business transactions

GST will typically impact any business at two ends of the spectrum where transactions are involved i.e. for input transactions and for output transactions.

  • Input transactions: An input transaction is a transaction carried out for the supply of input goods / services like raw material procurement, imports etc. Input transactions will be directly affected due to the changes in taxation levels of raw materials/industrial inputs, affecting the product or service pricing.
  • Output transactions: An output transaction is one that is done for outbound supplies or service delivery. For example, sales is an output transaction. GST will directly impact the sales by altering the taxation of the product or service being sold. Depending on the new tax slab of the goods or service, the profitability of the enterprise will be directly impacted.
    Another significant impact area is due to the concept of “place of supply” and “time of supply”, calling for more stringent supplier compliances.

Which SMEs are eligible for GST? 

SMEs are a major driver in the Indian economy, contributing to almost 7% of the manufacturing GDP and 31% of the services GDP. With a consistent growth rate of about 10%, they employ about 120 million people and contribute to around 46% of the overall exports from India.

Under the GST regime, this significant sector too is set to change. First and foremost, all businesses, including SMEs will need to register for GST under the rules as per the following threshold limits related to aggregate turnover:

Region Liability to Register Liability for Payment of Tax
North East India Rs. 9 lakh Rs. 10 lakh
Rest of India Rs. 19 lakh Rs. 20 lakh

Why should SMEs enrol for GST? 

An SME registered under GST will be recognized as a legal provider of goods and/or services. Tax accounting will be streamlined. Such an SME will be able to maintain proper accounting of taxes paid on input goods or services, and be able to utilise the inputs credit facility to enable better cash flows. GST will provide an opportunity for SMEs to digitize their transaction management, making it efficient for the future. If such an SME scales up, it will be prepared in advance to manage large-scale transactions through software. GST enrolment thus provides a window of opportunity to modernise the business and set up standards for doing business easily in the future.

Moreover, digital transactions tend to leave a digital footprint. These footprints can be used to assess the sector with greater accuracy, as Fintech lenders can create customized financial solutions for these SMEs, which are currently under-served from a credit perspective.

Impact of GST on SMEs

Overall, the SME sector seems to be skittish about the impact of GST. Here is a look at some of the pros that GST brings to SMEs.

  • Ease of starting a business: The old tax regime requires new entrepreneurs to obtain VAT registration for every state separately, with each state having its own rules. Though GST too requires businesses to register in each state, the rules for GST are more uniform and outlined clearly on the portal. This will make it easier to set up an SME.
  • Ability to compete with multinationals and multi-state enterprises: GST is a destination-based taxation system and not source-based. Locally manufactured goods by SMEs will pay the same amount of tax as imported goods from multinationals. Moreover, corporates generally ‘stock transfer’ transfer goods to escape the taxes on inter-state transfers. SMEs are not able to ‘stock transfer’ goods due to lack of infrastructure; they physically transfer goods and pay inter-state taxes, leading to higher expenses. Under GST, the stock transfers would be taxed. This will help put SMEs at par with large multinational corporations, allowing them to compete on an equal tax footage.
  • Transparent transactions: SMEs often do not have the resources (processes and people) to dedicate to tax transaction management. GST will enable an online and transparent view of tax obligations and on-goings, minimizing the need to liaison with tax authorities offline. Though it will take some initial investment now, SMEs that streamline their transactions now will be setting up future-ready systems and processes.
  • Reduced tax burdens due to rise in threshold: Under the old regime, business owners with an annual turnover of Rs 5 lakh (Rs 10 lakh in the North East), mandatorily need to register for VAT and make VAT payments. Under GST businesses above Rs 20 lakh turnover (Rs 10 lakh for North East) qualify for GST registration, which brings huge relief to SMEs. Thus, businesses that fall in the Rs 5 lakh – Rs 10 lakh revenue bucket need not register and will experience better cash flows because they are exempt from GST.
  • Better Cash flow due to input credit facility: Cash flows may increase because of facility of input tax credit, wherein businesses will be able to avail credit on input expenses such as supplies. For example, for a business that procures steel as the raw material to manufacture utensils, the businessman will need to pay tax on the raw materials procured i.e. iron ore. He can adjust the tax paid on inputs from the taxes collected on outputs. This means that only the actual “value addition will be taxed.
  • Better logistics: GST will help eliminate time-consuming border tax protocols, allowing for free flow of goods across borders. This will result in savings in logistical costs. CRISIL estimates that the logistical cost for companies manufacturing bulk goods will be reduced by around 20%.

Key Concerns around GST

  • Investment to go tech-savvy: SMEs are typically not used to managing complex tax compliances, but GST will need SMEs to go digital. SMEs may need to hire or consult with GST experts to bring about a technology makeover resulting in additional expenses.
  • Reduced tax exemptions: SMEs are eligible to avail a central excise threshold exemption of Rs 1.5 crore gross turnover; under the GST regime this exemption will reduce to Rs 20 lakh. As a result, SMEs with turnovers between Rs 20 lakh and Rs 1.5 crore will not be eligible for this tax exemption. This is an additional cost that will pinch SMEs that were previously used to being tax exempt.
  • Higher tax rates may impact profitability: Despite assurances by the Finance Minister that overall tax slabs will not increase, the GST slabs indicate otherwise. The services tax rate has distinctly increased from 15% to 18%. Higher tax outflows means lesser profitability.
  • Strict tax-compliance norms means more costs: GST will bring in an era of stringent compliance. For example, purchase invoices raised will have to be reconciled with the supplier of the goods. These invoices have to be uploaded by the entity by the 10th of every month and will need to be reconciled by the 15th of every month. SMEs are not used to carrying out such detailed and timely tax transactions and will need to hire personnel to help with tax management and compliance.
  • Supplier-side compliance will affect the GST compliance rating: The ability of an SME to claim refunds is a direct result of its GST compliance rating. Going ahead, SMEs will be accountable for their suppliers’ non-compliance and they may take a hit on their Compliance Rating due to non-compliance at any leg of the operating cycle, right from procurement to service. Maintaining compliance records, periodic audits will need to be instated to ensure compliance of all stakeholders. This responsibility of supplier-side compliance is an added cost to the company.
  • Time lag in input credit process: Input credit will only be available after a supplier declares the particulars of the supply and after these details are validated by the buyer electronically. Thus, a supplier is heavily dependent on the buyer’s response, leading to a probable time lag in availing input credit. Moreover, the timeline for claiming input tax credit is very limited— before the due date of filing returns for September of the next financial year, or, the due date of filing annual returns, whichever is later.

GST is all set to usher in an era of simplified taxation. SMEs must decide on the right investments to optimise the benefits of the change. This means investing time and resources in understanding the change, getting the right people and processes to change the way they do business to ensure GST-adherence. Such SMEs will emerge future-ready and poised to scale their business like never before.Get more information about GST on our GST blog.

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Oct 24, 2018

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A digital prescription for the pharma industry

Must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness.

Oct 24, 2018

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GIFF – Redefining Business Finance for SMEs

A global economy is characterised not only by the free movement of goods and services but, more importantly, by the free movement of ideas and of capital.”     ~ George Soros

As a fully digitized lending platform, Capital Float provides flexible credit products to small and medium enterprises that are working towards achieving business growth. The Great Indian Finance Festival (GIFF) has been initiated to add further impetus to this objective. Organised in the Q2 of every financial year, this exclusive SME loan carnival brings opportunities for SMEs to get Capital Float’s business loans at reduced interest rates. This helps SMEs in procuring adequate capital to prepare for the festive season in India when the retail industry has maximum revenue-generating opportunities.

GIFF is driven by the vision that in a huge and culturally-diverse country like India, it is significant to fuel growth and entrepreneurship by providing access to finance to high potential, but traditionally under-served SMEs.

Building on Government initiatives

The launch of government-backed schemes such as Pradhan Mantri Jan-Dhan Yojana led to a considerable increase in the number of bank accounts, but reportedly only about 15% of adult customers used these accounts to receive or make payments. Furthermore, as per a study by the Ministry of Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, only 6% of small businesses obtain finance from organised lenders, hinting at the challenges for SMEs in getting loans¹. To sustain an economic growth rate of 7% to 8% per annum, there has to be a focus on widening the scope of financial institutions.

A survey involving 540 SMEs by the Firstbiz and Greyhound Knowledge Group in 2016 revealed that over 90% of the SMEs in India found ‘lack of easy finance and credit instruments’ to be their most critical challenge.

With a deep understanding of the market, Capital Float has consistently worked to provide easier access to loans to SMEs when compared to traditional banking channels. We bring you customized working capital solutions, borrower experience enhanced by technology and convenient processes to power your journey. Our objective is to enable SMEs in India to #BreakLimits and realize their true business potential.

The Indian SME is becoming a digital entity

A big change in the credit market comes from the digital lifestyle of Indian consumers. Currently, India is the second largest smartphone market with a user base of over 230 million. Moreover, an increasing number of SMEs are operating online by partnering with ecosystem juggernauts like Amazon, Flipkart, Alibaba, etc. Post demonetization in November 2016, a significant number of enterprises installed POS terminals at their stores, through which consumers could engage in cashless transactions. The Government has digitized data through initiatives like AADHAAR and GSTN, which can be used by Fintech lenders like Capital Float to assess and underwrite borrowers with higher levels of accuracy.

Capital Float has emerged a market leader in this environment by establishing itself as an online lending platform that offers customized working capital solutions. We have tailored a wide SME loan portfolio to ensure that we have a loan for every kind of SME and micro-entrepreneur in the country. For instance, we provide Online Seller Finance for e-commerce sellers operation on leading online marketplaces, and also service retailers using POS machines from the likes of Pine Labs, Mswipe, ICICI Merchant Cash Services, etc.

By using Capital Float services during GIFF, business credit seekers can get loans from ₹1 lakh to ₹100 lakhs starting from 16%. This is coupled with our BAU processes to enhance borrower experience in the form of live chats, knowledge centres and means to track loan application status online.

Conclusion

GIFF welcomes businesses from across the country to empower their journey for the festive season in 2017. Capital Float is ready to take quick and accurate lending decisions for them. We have comprehensive credit packages unfettered by restrictive lending policies, inflexible collateral requirements and slow disbursals times. SMEs can apply for loans online in ten minutes, upload the documentation required and receive funds in their account within three days.

In a phase where banks have tightened their purse strings to deal with bad loans, NBFCs are coming up with new strategies to spark up the investment drive. Capital Float is leading the initiative through GIFF, thereby contributing to the growth of SMEs in India. Providing cutting-edge working capital solutions for the SME sector is our organisation’s raison d’etre, and we have planned our policies accordingly.

Know more about the Great Indian Finance Festival 2017 at https://www.capitalfloat.com/giff

Oct 24, 2018