Working Capital Financing: Why It Is Essential For The Success Of a Business

India is on the path of robust economic growth. According to official figures, the economy was valued at $2.2 trillion in 2016, making it the world’s seventh largest economy in terms of nominal GDP. The Indian economy is expected to reach the $5 trillion mark by 2025, according to a report published by Morgan Stanley in February 2017. India seems to have all the right ingredients in place to achieve this phenomenal growth; the country’s millennial population is massive, there’s availability of cheap labor, the government’s policies are favorable, Indians have exhibited high adoption of the latest technological advancements and the SME segment is growing at a fairly healthy rate.

The SME (Small and Medium Enterprises) sector is critical to the development of the Indian economy. It contributed 40% of the nation’s exports and 45% of total manufacturing output in 2015. The segment’s contribution to India’s GDP is expected to grow from 17% recorded in 2010-2011 to 22% by 2020.

Despite these facts, the SME sector has witnessed some challenges with regards to financing. The need for cash to manage daily operations and the inability to access commercial finance have hindered the development of SMEs.

Why is Working Capital So Critical for Any Business?

All businesses need some funds to run their daily, weekly and monthly operations. Working capital is, therefore, essential for the smooth working of a business. The main reasons for working capital being so important are:

Enhances Solvency: Working capital aids a business to operate smoothly and meet all its short-term expenses, including purchasing raw materials, payment of salaries and meeting overhead expenses. Some of these payments cannot be delayed. Having sufficient liquidity helps the uninterrupted flow of production; thus, maintaining the solvency of a business.

Increased Goodwill: When a business is able to promptly meet its regular expenses and pay salaries on time, it generates goodwill, not just internally with employees but also with suppliers and distributors.

Uninterrupted Supply of Raw Materials: Quick payments ensure regular supply of raw materials. Suppliers of raw materials are usually apprehensive about small businesses being able to make the payments and do not offer a suitable credit period. The inability to pay suppliers can result in production coming to a standstill.

Improved Ability to Face Any Crisis: Apart from the smooth functioning of business operations, working capital ensures that any financial emergency can be handled with ease. Sometimes businesses face an unforeseen event, like an order being rejected, unfavorable weather conditions or the unavailability of a particular resource. A business that has sufficient liquidity can cushion itself against such situations. Thus, the financing of working capital defines the financial health of a business and how smoothly it can operate under different circumstances.

Why is Working Capital Finance So Difficult to Get for SMEs?

The most critical challenge that even profitable SMEs face is the lack of working capital, given their inability to access commercial finance. Public sector banks are burdened by bad debt loans to offer any support to these companies. Traditional banking institutions are apprehensive about offering commercial finance to SMEs and place stringent eligibility criteria for approval. Most of their loans require collateral to be furnished even for financing of working capital.

The greatest problem is that the loan application and approval process of traditional banking institutions is so tedious and prolonged, that SMEs find it excruciatingly painful to access these options. They may have to wait months only to have their loan application rejected. SMEs, therefore, look for alternate sources for financing of working capital and turn towards unorganized moneylenders who charge exorbitant interest rates.

Working Capital Financing Needs Met By Technology

SMEs need financing of working capital. They need swift and easy availability of commercial finance, without the need for extensive paperwork and collateral. The solution finally arrived in the form of FinTech lenders like Capital Float.

The FinTech segment has revolutionized the financing of working capital for SMEs by using cutting-edge technology in the loan application, underwriting and approval processes. This enables the disbursement of funds to SMEs within a matter of days.

Types of Working Capital Financing

There are a number of flexible, short-term and collateral-free loans offered that can be used to service new orders, purchase inventory and maintain cash cycles. These include:

Term Finance: This is ideal for SMEs particularly in the manufacturing and distribution space that need funds to meet operational needs or to expand and diversify the business.

Online Seller Finance: This is best suited for businesses that sell their products on leading online marketplaces. Capital Float has partnered with India’s largest marketplaces, like Amazon, PayTM, Snapdeal, Myntra, Shopclues and eBay to offer eCommerce sellers customized working capital finance.

Pay Later Finance: This product offers a credit facility and suits SMEs that have to regularly replenish their inventory. This revolving credit facility enables a borrower to make timely supplier payments from a predetermined credit amount. This amount can be reset upon repayment and is made available for further use.

Merchant Cash Advance: This credit solution is for businesses that receive payments via credit / debit cards via PoS (point of sale) machines. Capital Float has partnerships with multiple PoS machine vendors such as Pine Labs, Mswipe, ICICI Merchant Services, MRL Posnet and Bijlipay, expanding its reach to merchants across the country.

Supply Chain Finance: This commercial finance product allows businesses to use their invoices or accounts receivables as the basis to gain access to liquid funds.

SMEs are of strategic importance to the Indian economy and deserve a business climate in which they can thrive and grow. The financing of working capital made available by FinTech lenders will help the SME segment to move forward and contribute significantly to the growth of the Indian economy.

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7 TIPS TO SAVE MONEY WHILE MANAGING PERSONAL FINANCES

In today’s world, saving money is of the utmost importance. If you are stressed about how to save money, then you are not the only one in this regard. Financial planning sounds easier than to practice. Even though it may be more exciting to spend money, you should try to practice saving for contingencies, as the future cannot be predicted and is uncertain.

Why is saving money essential?

Saving money can help you to become financially independent, providing you with security in the face of emergencies. Financial planning is necessary to set aside money for the family’s needs, such as the education of children, marriage expenses, healthcare expenses, planning for significant life events, retirement, etc. Saving money is an effective financial practice and a lifestyle choice with several proven benefits.

7 tips to save money

Though there are several ways to save money, you could consider implementing these seven tips:

  • Awareness: Being aware is one of the most critical factors. If you are aware of your finances and spending habits, you will be able to consciously set more money aside.  
  • Prepare a budget: Begin by identifying your fixed and flexible expenses. This will help you evaluate how much of your corpus is depleted by unnecessary expenditure. After this, you can prepare a budget on a weekly or monthly basis by setting expenditure limits. This will help you pay your bills while simultaneously creating a pool of savings. You can make a budget on a weekly or monthly basis (based on your preference) with spending limits clearly defined. This budget may help you in saving extra money and restricting unnecessary expenditures.
  • Curb the spendthrift in you: Many people aren’t always conscious of how lavishly they spend money on unimportant things. Tracking expenses will help you maintain a close vigil on expenses and keep the spendthrift within under control.
  • Create an emergency fund: While facing emergencies, financial support in the form of insurance or loans may not be immediately available or they may not cover the need of the hour. At such times, savings come in handy to address the contingency. Therefore, make sure you set aside a fund for unforeseen expenses.
  • Sell things you no longer use: There are many things we buy, and after some time, do not use any more. These items can be sold to generate funds.
  • Savings calculator: Various types of savings calculators can be found online. These can be used to calculate the amount one can save over a given period of time. Using these calculators could encourage the habit of saving.
  • Switch to a personal finance money management app: Spends tracking and budgeting can be made easy with personal finance management apps. Walnut is one of the most loved and rated apps in the market with over 10 million downloads. Use this app to unlock the financial planner in you. 

It is necessary to save money, as it provides security, financial independence, and reduces stress. Get started on your journey of personal financial planning to achieve peace of mind and money in the bank for when you need it.

Oct 24, 2018

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Tax Computation – 2 regimes

India’s Minister of Finance and Corporate Affairs Smt. Nirmala Sitharaman, on February 1, 2020 tabled the Union Budget for the FY 2020-21 in the Lok Sabha. She announced a new income tax regime in addition to the existing one, to provide relief to individual taxpayers. 

However, this new regime is optional and the taxpayers can choose between the old and the new, basis their suitability. The new regime has foregone certain deductions and exemptions. The tax rates have been reduced, but taxpayers will have to forego exemptions when choosing the new tax regime.

Let us take a look at the tax rates of individuals whose age is less than 60 years under both the regimes:

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-5 lakhs5%5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

From the above table, it is evident that the tax rates are lower in the new regime than the old regime. But, there is a list of exemptions and deductions that has to be conceded by the taxpayers. This list includes but is not limited to the following:

i) Leave Travel Allowance (LTA)

ii) Conveyance

iii) House Rent Allowance (HRA)

iv) Uniform Allowance

v) Helper allowance

vi) Professional tax

vii) Standard deduction

viii) Other special allowances [Section 10(14)]

ix) Interest on housing loan (Section 24) on self occupied property

x) Chapter VI-A deduction (80C,80D, 80E and so on) (Except Section 80CCD(2) and 80JJA)

Savings calculation based on income

PARTICULARSOld Tax Regime(Rs.)
Gross Income15,00,000
Less: Deductions- 
      U/S 80C (Investment in PPF)1,50,000
      U/S 80D (Medical Insurance – Self, spouse, children)25,000
      U/S 80TTA (Interest Income from Savings account on a bank)10,000
Taxable Income13,15,000

TAX ON TAXABLE INCOME (OLD TAX SLAB)(Rs.)(Rs.)
At normal rate, on the income of Rs. 13,15,000:  
Up to 2.5 lakhsNil 
2.5-5 lakhs @5%12,500 
5-7.5 lakhs @20%50,000 
7.5-10 lakhs @20%50,000 
10-12.5 lakhs @30%75,000
12.5-13.15 lakhs @30%19,500 
Total 2,07,000
Add: Cess @4% on Rs. 2,07,000 8,280
Tax Liability 2,15,280

From the above illustration, it is evident that taxpayers can reduce their taxable income by investing in tax saving instruments such as Provident Fund, Medical Insurance, etc. that appear as deductions under section 80C to 80U of the Income Tax Act, 1961.

PARTICULARSNew Tax Regime (Rs.)
Gross Income15,00,000
Less: DeductionsNil
Taxable Income15,00,000

TAX ON TAXABLE INCOME (NEW TAX SLAB)(Rs.)(Rs.)
At normal rate, on the income of Rs. 15,00,000:  
Up to 2.5 lakhsNil 
2.5-5 lakhs @5%12,500 
5-7.5 lakhs @10%25,000 
7.5-10 lakhs @15%37,500 
10-12.5 lakhs @20%50,000 
12.5-15 lakhs @25%62,500 
Total 1,87,500
Add: Cess @4% on Rs. 1,87,500 7,500
Tax Liability 1,95,000

From the above illustration, having regard to the income level and the deductions being claimed by the taxpayer, it is possible that taxpayers can save money because of the low tax rates of the new regime, however the same needs to be evaluated on a case-to-case basis.

Tax rates under both the regimes for senior citizens

Tax rates for individuals whose age is 60 years or more but less than 80 years (Senior citizens):

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-3 lakhsNil5%
3-5 lakhs5%5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

Tax rates for individuals whose age is 80 years or more (Super senior citizens):

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-5 lakhsNil5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

The Government has offered two types of regimes for tax computations for individuals– the old and the new system. The taxpayers should scrutinize and study both systems before opting for one. They should take into consideration their salaries, expenditures, savings, etc to select the system that is suitable for them. 

Disclaimer: This blog post is based on the provisions of the Finance Act,2020 as passed by the Parliament. Any subsequent notifications have not been factored into this post.

Oct 24, 2018

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We want to be in 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months: Gaurav Hinduja & Sashank Rishyasringa – Business Standard

Written by Alnoor Peermohamed

Bengaluru-based startup Capital Float, which lends to small and medium enterprises (SMEs), plans to grow its presence from 40 cities to a 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months. While sellers on e-commerce platforms make up a large chunk of whom the company lends to, it says it will focus more on tier 2 and tier 3 businesses, which might be solely offline but have the potential to grow massively. Gaurav Hinduja and Sashank Rishyasringa, founders of Capital Floatalk to Alnoor Peermohamed in the company’s plans. Edited excerpts:

The e-commerce segment is fairly new and there’s bound to be volatility. How do you think that might impact your business?

Hinduja: E-commerce merchants are the core to what we do and it’s an important vertical, but we’ve also diversified outside.

We do loans to a lot traditional SMEs — brick and mortar, manufacturing and service type of organisations because that segment is 30-40 million, whereas e-commerce is 100-200 thousand. I think almost all sellers sell on all marketplaces. And when we underwrite the business, we look at a combination of things. Sales across marketplaces, and how does that look across his offline sales as well, because a lot of sell offline. We look at a holistic view of the business before we actually decide to give the person a loan.

Data on sellers is harder to come by in the offline world. How are you tackling that?

Rishyasringa: You’ll be surprised as to how much data is available on any business in India and that’s very much a big part of the IP we’ve built since the early days. I think what we’ve been able to do is build a lot of pipes for data sources such as Aadhaar, NSDL, and a whole host of other government and legal databases.

The borrower is also able to give us access to a lot of data that we can then use in deciding what terms and what kind of loan to give them. For example, social media is a very interesting input that we consider in our underwriting model.

On the online piece, yes there is some additional data which helps with the speed of lending. So today we give real time approvals to e-commerce sellers in 10 to 15 minutes.

What is your primary source of raising capital?

Hinduja: Like most financial institutions we obviously raise equity right, and we have raised a little over Rs 100 crore from some of the best VCs, but also we have raised debt.

What are your sort of default rates? How are you working to keep them low?

Hinduja: Ironically, a lot of the bank’s defaulters are not coming from the SME sector. They’re actually coming from large borrowers. A lot of what we do is the underwriting, through different data, and we do that to keep our credit costs, which are defaults, et cetera, really low.

Today they are very low, I’d say 80-90 per cent better than any NBFC that lends to SMEs out there. That said, it is still early days. This is a lending business at the end of the day, there are going to be defaults.

What do you think will happen when guys like Alibaba increase their focus in India? Where do you fit in?

Rishyasringa: B2B e-commerce has the potential to be far larger than B2C e-commerce in India. And we think what Alibaba has been able to achieve in China and in India with its SME base for exporters and importers is tremendous.

We are partners with Alibaba. You can infer from that, that we’re already active in the space and its part of our strategy.

How is this partnership going to work?

Hinduja: They’re going to look at us to help get more SMEs to become active Alibaba users. But at the same time a lot of their SME merchant base will require financing, whether it’s for domestic transactions, or cross border transactions. They will look at a financer that really has the speed and the agility to meet the SMEs requirements in that sense.

What are your growth plans?

Hinduja: We want to be in 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months and obviously a lot of that growth is going to come from tier 2 and tier 3 towns. Because banks really don’t have a presence there.

While people and SMEs in the top 8-10 cities can still access a bank branch, bank branch penetration in those tier 2 tier 3 towns is almost negligible. I think that’s where we’ll see a lot of growth and through the make in India and e-commerce stuff you’ll see a lot of business growth in those cities as well.

What sort of regulatory hurdles do you see yourselves having to cross?

Rishyasringa: Actually in the financial services space I think we’ve got a very proactive regulator and what you’re seeing in these payment banks, small finance banks, e-KYC, I think these are all steps in the right direction and we obviously hope that we continue to see these steps.

News piece sourced from Business Standard. Read the full piece here.

Oct 24, 2018