5 Things to Know About Short Term Business Loans

If you are planning to embark on a new venture or are already running an enterprise, knowing all about short-term loans will serve you well.

Money plays a crucial role in your entrepreneurial journey, determining the size and scope of your business. After all, when you are brimming with ideas to cater to a market need, the last thing you want on your hands is a financial concern that could result in a compromised business opportunity.

Fortunately every problem has a solution and financial solutions for businesses come in many forms.

Reach out to experts

Should you require commercial finance, a short-term business loan could prove to be immensely useful. Wondering what exactly short-term loans are? You could ask friends who have applied for one, or approach specialized financial companies like us. You would be better placed to know more about short term business loans before applying for one. This is particularly useful if you are venturing into business for the first time as a small entrepreneur.

What is a short-term loan?

The simplest way to understand the concept of a short-term loan is to think of it as a business loan that provides immediate working capital to your company. You are given a lump sum amount that you have to repay within a period of one year, or up to five years at most. This is in contrast to other loans which can be repaid over a longer term.

Financial experts say that a short term business loans hold the potential of making or breaking your company. As per a study, conducted by the National Small Business Association, 19% of small business owners cite lack of available capital as the major challenge in their growth, and 82% of businesses fail due to improper management of cash flow.

Given its importance to small businesses, let’s take a quick look at the implications of a short-term business loan.

Factors to keep in mind

Short-term loans are easier to obtain as compared to long-term loans. You can avail of them in the alternative finance market through online lenders, and thus you can completely bypass the slow and cumbersome conventional lenders like banks. These loans are less tedious to get as they have a shorter list of qualifications and lesser paperwork. But you also need to repay them faster, usually within a year. If you manage to raise your profitability in the short term, this can be comfortably achieved.

However, there are certain points that you need to keep in mind while applying for a short-term loan. The interest rates of short-term loans are relatively higher in the commercial finance segment. Thus, it’s advisable for you to go through and understand the total cost of the loan before applying for it. Short-term loans often demand frequent payments from you. In case you don’t have regular/stable cash flow, you may find it difficult to repay your loan with weekly payments.

To help you further, here are five things you should know before applying for a short-term loan.

  1. Be clear about the purpose: Having a clear purpose is the pre-requisite for exploring a short-term business loan. It’s of utmost importance to be crystal clear as to the purpose of the loan—to hire new talent, expand your supplier network, invest in technology etc. If the purpose is not clear, the loan amount could well be frittered away on incidental expenses that can hold back the progress of young companies. Analyze in detail if the short-term loan is going to work for you in your current situation.
  2. Have an operational plan: Have a clear business strategy in place before securing a loan from a financier. It’s crucial to have a strategy that optimizes your resources. Without a proper business plan/strategy, it’s likely that you are going to find yourself in a debt-trap.
  3. Research interest rates and overall cost: Interest rates are an important part of any loan. It’s a smart move to know the interest rates on your dream loan early on, along with the other charges/fees that your lender may levy. A fee would not cause an increase in your interest rate, but it will be a part of your monthly payments.
  4. Calculate risks: As a wise entrepreneur, it is crucial that you carefully weigh all the possible risks before arriving at any decision. Analyze and ask yourself questions like: Will this loan help me in reaping the benefits? Will it generate regular cash flow? Will I be able to repay my loan in regular weekly or monthly payments?
  5. Know your loan duration: Apart from calculating all the risks, and having the strategy in place, it is important to know the duration of your loan and to choose the repayment tenure wisely. You can choose a slightly extended period, keeping risks and emergencies in mind, instead of choosing a short tenure.

Take a leap of faith

We understand that the journey of any venture, especially of a small business, is not an easy one. It takes a lot to take your business to a certain level and when issues like finances become a hindrance, one is likely to lose hope. But remember, today’s new age financial solutions offer a timely respite. Yet, you need to have an analytical and calculative mind, which can understand the pros and cons of the loan in order to leverage it fully.

If you are still in a dilemma, wondering how to get loan for your business or are unable to decide if a short-term business loan suits you or not, we, at Capital Float would be more than happy to assist you.

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Firstly, the IRR is better understood when used to compare returns from two or more investments. The decision rule is rather simple – the higher the IRR, the better. The confusion arises when investors look at the IRR in isolation i.e. an investment yields a 20% IRR so what does that mean? The answer is a complicated one and often leads to more questions.

Secondly, the IRR is a multi-period return measure. What this means is that when investors would like to compare investments that span different time periods, IRR becomes the best tool for this purpose. For instance, investment A returns 20% in X years whereas investment B returns 25% in Y years. The question as to which investment performs better is best answered by the IRR.

Thirdly, the IRR works best when investments have conventional cash flows patterns i.e. a negative cash flow followed by multiple positive cash flows. Any variations herein are bound to be detrimental to the IRR calculation. For instance, you buy a stock (negative cash flow) and receive dividends (positive cash flow) during the holding period. The IRR works well in this scenario. However, if you short a stock (positive cash flow) and buy another one (negative cash flow) with the proceeds and finally square of the transaction (positive or negative cash flow) later on, the IRR may not necessarily yield desired results.

Lastly, due to its very definition, in some instances an investment may have no IRR at all or at least one that can be determined! Obviously, in such instances, the IRR is of no use and creates confusion in the mind of the investor. Therefore, the challenges in interpreting IRR arise when investors use the IRR for purposes other than those mentioned above.

Although this list is by no means exhaustive, it captures the salient features of the IRR. Hope this piece has helped simplify the concept and gives you confidence to seamlessly compare investments using IRR.

Vinay Basavaraj

Vinay boasts of a decade of experience working in both large and small organizations. His roles have ranged from sales to operations and even a stint in academia. He currently manages affairs in capital markets in Capital Float.

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Tax Slabs & Understanding the Dynamics of Transactions under GST

Effective July 01, India would be joining a host of 160 other countries that have implemented GST/VAT in some form. This is a big step towards streamlined taxation norms. From new indirect tax slabs to drastically different taxation procedures, the Goods and Services Tax or the GST, will compel companies and taxpayers to realign their operating models.

Tax slabs in India under GST 

The new indirect taxation regime is based on a four-slab tax structure, and goods and services feature in these depending on their nature – whether it is a luxury item, a necessity or a leisure item. A total of 1211 items have been categorised under these four tax slabs, with a bulk of them (including services) being placed in the 18% bracket.

Previous tax rate (Approximate range) GST Rate Goods Services
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~ 9% to 15% 12% Apparel over Rs 1000, Ayurvedic medicines, exercise books, preserves like pickles, sauces, ketchups, and fruit and vegetable preserves, umbrellas and packaged foods like butter, ghee, cheese, dry fruits. Basic cell phones. Non-AC hotels, pesticides and fertilisers, business class air tickets and work contracts.
~ 15% and 21% 28% Luxury goods and sin goods: SUVs, aerated drinks, white goods, paints,  ATM/ vending machines, vehicles, personal aircrafts; Sin goods such as bidis, chewing gum, paan masala. Certain select consumables will attract an additional cess. Movie tickets above Rs 100, five star hotels, race clubs, betting and other luxury services.

– Gold and rough diamonds have been allocated separate tax percentages of 3% and 0.25% respectively.

– Certain goods such as alcohol (for human consumption), consumption and sale of electricity, stamp duty and customs duty, and five petroleum products, namely, crude oil, natural gas, aviation fuel, diesel, and petrol have been excluded from GST for the initial years.

1. The GST council has revised the tax rates on 27 goods and 12 services with effect from 6 October 2017. Click here to read the revised list.

2. The GST council has revised the tax rates on 177 goods and services with effect from 15 November 2017.

3. The 25th GST Council met on 18 January 2018, where a third round of revisions was announced on 29 goods and 53 services, with effect from 25 January 2018.

How the transactions will change

Businesses will be impacted at both ends, i.e., at the inbound transactions such as imports (international business) and procurements (domestic), and at the outbound transactions, i.e., the sales. Here are some important transformations:

Place of Supply: Currently, many businesses operate on a state-wise warehousing model as transfers between inter-state warehouses are considered as stock transfers and are not liable to pay CST. Under GST, inter-state stock transfers between warehouses will also be subject to IGST at the “Place of Supply”. For example, a supplier of steel from Jharkhand to Orissa and Kerala, will need to pay IGST on the transfer of goods in Orissa and Kerala respectively. If there is a transfer of steel from the warehouse in Kerala to the warehouse in Orissa, IGST would still be applicable, but CST wouldn’t be payable on such a transaction. This change has been proposed to discourage suppliers from having multiple warehouses and adopt a single warehousing system.

Consideration of “Time of Supply Rules”: This factor determines when goods / services are to be supplied, and therefore, when the tax is to be paid (point of taxation). Under the GST, the Time of Supply for goods and services is the earlier of the following dates: (a) the date of issuing of invoice (or the last day by which invoice should have been issued) OR (b) the date of receipt of payment; whichever is earlier. For example, if the date of invoicing is May 20 and payment is received on July 1, the time of supply will be May 20. Which means that the  government wants to collect the tax at the earliest possible point in time, and businesses must plan their working capital keeping in mind these advanced payment timelines.

Provisions of Input Tax Credit: Input tax refers to the taxes that a manufacturer or service provider pays while buying the raw material or inputs. Under the GST, a business can reduce the tax it has paid on inputs from the taxes collected on outputs. In effect, businesses will be taxed only on the “value addition”. For example, if a manufacturer is paying Rs 300 on final product and has paid Rs 200 on inputs, he can claim input credit on Rs 200 and has a tax liability of only Rs 100. This facility will bring down the overall tax expenses of companies.

Lower exemption thresholds for Small Scale Industries: Currently, small scale industries can avail central excise threshold exemption of Rs. 1.5 crore. With the GST, this limit will be reduced to Rs. 20 lakh. As a result, a company that used to avail tax exemption of 1.5 crore can now avail only 20 lakh, leading to higher tax payments.   Benefits from higher registration threshold: Businesses with turnover of over 20 lakh (10 lakh for the North East) must mandatorily register for GST. Currently, the criteria for VAT is that businesses with turnover of over Rs 5 lakh (Rs 10 lakh for North East) must register for VAT. As a result a business that was in the Rs 5 lakh – Rs 20 lakh bracket is now exempt from indirect taxation.

These are some of the business-transactional implications of the GST. Organisations will have to design and implement extensive change management exercises to align GST with their desired business outcomes. Get more information about GST on our GST blog.

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Oct 24, 2018