Implications of GST on SMEs

One of the biggest tax revolutions of India is underway as businesses and tax payers are gearing up for the change. These enterprises and individuals are assessing how the GST rollout will make a difference to them. One such segment is the Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) segment, which contributes significantly to India’s GDP and exports. The positive effects from GST are expected to drive decentralization of opportunities and provide an impetus to India’s GDP. However there is some concern that some of its policy implications could slow down business, and that is what small and medium enterprises must prepare for. Gaining know-how on GST rules and implications is the first step towards becoming GST-compliant and becoming tax-savvy. This blog will help you understand which SMEs are eligible for GST and the impact on the sector as a whole.

How GST will impact business transactions

GST will typically impact any business at two ends of the spectrum where transactions are involved i.e. for input transactions and for output transactions.

  • Input transactions: An input transaction is a transaction carried out for the supply of input goods / services like raw material procurement, imports etc. Input transactions will be directly affected due to the changes in taxation levels of raw materials/industrial inputs, affecting the product or service pricing.
  • Output transactions: An output transaction is one that is done for outbound supplies or service delivery. For example, sales is an output transaction. GST will directly impact the sales by altering the taxation of the product or service being sold. Depending on the new tax slab of the goods or service, the profitability of the enterprise will be directly impacted.
    Another significant impact area is due to the concept of “place of supply” and “time of supply”, calling for more stringent supplier compliances.

Which SMEs are eligible for GST? 

SMEs are a major driver in the Indian economy, contributing to almost 7% of the manufacturing GDP and 31% of the services GDP. With a consistent growth rate of about 10%, they employ about 120 million people and contribute to around 46% of the overall exports from India.

Under the GST regime, this significant sector too is set to change. First and foremost, all businesses, including SMEs will need to register for GST under the rules as per the following threshold limits related to aggregate turnover:

Region Liability to Register Liability for Payment of Tax
North East India Rs. 9 lakh Rs. 10 lakh
Rest of India Rs. 19 lakh Rs. 20 lakh

Why should SMEs enrol for GST? 

An SME registered under GST will be recognized as a legal provider of goods and/or services. Tax accounting will be streamlined. Such an SME will be able to maintain proper accounting of taxes paid on input goods or services, and be able to utilise the inputs credit facility to enable better cash flows. GST will provide an opportunity for SMEs to digitize their transaction management, making it efficient for the future. If such an SME scales up, it will be prepared in advance to manage large-scale transactions through software. GST enrolment thus provides a window of opportunity to modernise the business and set up standards for doing business easily in the future.

Moreover, digital transactions tend to leave a digital footprint. These footprints can be used to assess the sector with greater accuracy, as Fintech lenders can create customized financial solutions for these SMEs, which are currently under-served from a credit perspective.

Impact of GST on SMEs

Overall, the SME sector seems to be skittish about the impact of GST. Here is a look at some of the pros that GST brings to SMEs.

  • Ease of starting a business: The old tax regime requires new entrepreneurs to obtain VAT registration for every state separately, with each state having its own rules. Though GST too requires businesses to register in each state, the rules for GST are more uniform and outlined clearly on the portal. This will make it easier to set up an SME.
  • Ability to compete with multinationals and multi-state enterprises: GST is a destination-based taxation system and not source-based. Locally manufactured goods by SMEs will pay the same amount of tax as imported goods from multinationals. Moreover, corporates generally ‘stock transfer’ transfer goods to escape the taxes on inter-state transfers. SMEs are not able to ‘stock transfer’ goods due to lack of infrastructure; they physically transfer goods and pay inter-state taxes, leading to higher expenses. Under GST, the stock transfers would be taxed. This will help put SMEs at par with large multinational corporations, allowing them to compete on an equal tax footage.
  • Transparent transactions: SMEs often do not have the resources (processes and people) to dedicate to tax transaction management. GST will enable an online and transparent view of tax obligations and on-goings, minimizing the need to liaison with tax authorities offline. Though it will take some initial investment now, SMEs that streamline their transactions now will be setting up future-ready systems and processes.
  • Reduced tax burdens due to rise in threshold: Under the old regime, business owners with an annual turnover of Rs 5 lakh (Rs 10 lakh in the North East), mandatorily need to register for VAT and make VAT payments. Under GST businesses above Rs 20 lakh turnover (Rs 10 lakh for North East) qualify for GST registration, which brings huge relief to SMEs. Thus, businesses that fall in the Rs 5 lakh – Rs 10 lakh revenue bucket need not register and will experience better cash flows because they are exempt from GST.
  • Better Cash flow due to input credit facility: Cash flows may increase because of facility of input tax credit, wherein businesses will be able to avail credit on input expenses such as supplies. For example, for a business that procures steel as the raw material to manufacture utensils, the businessman will need to pay tax on the raw materials procured i.e. iron ore. He can adjust the tax paid on inputs from the taxes collected on outputs. This means that only the actual “value addition will be taxed.
  • Better logistics: GST will help eliminate time-consuming border tax protocols, allowing for free flow of goods across borders. This will result in savings in logistical costs. CRISIL estimates that the logistical cost for companies manufacturing bulk goods will be reduced by around 20%.

Key Concerns around GST

  • Investment to go tech-savvy: SMEs are typically not used to managing complex tax compliances, but GST will need SMEs to go digital. SMEs may need to hire or consult with GST experts to bring about a technology makeover resulting in additional expenses.
  • Reduced tax exemptions: SMEs are eligible to avail a central excise threshold exemption of Rs 1.5 crore gross turnover; under the GST regime this exemption will reduce to Rs 20 lakh. As a result, SMEs with turnovers between Rs 20 lakh and Rs 1.5 crore will not be eligible for this tax exemption. This is an additional cost that will pinch SMEs that were previously used to being tax exempt.
  • Higher tax rates may impact profitability: Despite assurances by the Finance Minister that overall tax slabs will not increase, the GST slabs indicate otherwise. The services tax rate has distinctly increased from 15% to 18%. Higher tax outflows means lesser profitability.
  • Strict tax-compliance norms means more costs: GST will bring in an era of stringent compliance. For example, purchase invoices raised will have to be reconciled with the supplier of the goods. These invoices have to be uploaded by the entity by the 10th of every month and will need to be reconciled by the 15th of every month. SMEs are not used to carrying out such detailed and timely tax transactions and will need to hire personnel to help with tax management and compliance.
  • Supplier-side compliance will affect the GST compliance rating: The ability of an SME to claim refunds is a direct result of its GST compliance rating. Going ahead, SMEs will be accountable for their suppliers’ non-compliance and they may take a hit on their Compliance Rating due to non-compliance at any leg of the operating cycle, right from procurement to service. Maintaining compliance records, periodic audits will need to be instated to ensure compliance of all stakeholders. This responsibility of supplier-side compliance is an added cost to the company.
  • Time lag in input credit process: Input credit will only be available after a supplier declares the particulars of the supply and after these details are validated by the buyer electronically. Thus, a supplier is heavily dependent on the buyer’s response, leading to a probable time lag in availing input credit. Moreover, the timeline for claiming input tax credit is very limited— before the due date of filing returns for September of the next financial year, or, the due date of filing annual returns, whichever is later.

GST is all set to usher in an era of simplified taxation. SMEs must decide on the right investments to optimise the benefits of the change. This means investing time and resources in understanding the change, getting the right people and processes to change the way they do business to ensure GST-adherence. Such SMEs will emerge future-ready and poised to scale their business like never before.Get more information about GST on our GST blog.

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Implications of GST for Trading

India is amongst the fastest growing economies of the world, with retail trade contributing an estimated $600 billion+ to the economy. The impact which GST, the unified indirect tax structure introduced by the Government of India on July 1 2017, brings on such a major economic lever will be highly significant.

Further, the implications of this new taxation procedure on the trader will vary on the nature of the trade, i.e., wholesale or retail. In this blog, we explain the opportunities within the new tax reform that traders can leverage, and discuss how they can prepare themselves from a GST perspective. Read on to know the effects of this latest indirect tax reform for:

  1. Wholesalers
  2. Retailers
  3. Importers and Exporters

1. For Wholesalers:

The wholesale market is fundamental to extending the reach of goods and services to the interiors of the country, especially the rural markets. Most wholesalers operate in cash transactions because of which there is a good chance that some transactions are not accounted for, which was previously a concern but ceases to be one under GST.

Given below are the main advantages that GST brings to wholesalers.

  • Transparent tax management: The introduction of technology into the taxation system can be a blessing in disguise, an opportunity to bring about transparency in tax management. Rather than relying on cash transactions, wholesalers will now get an opportunity to go digital. They will also be able to avail the facility of input tax credit. Input tax credit is where the businessman will be able to claim tax on all input goods and/or services. For example, if a wholesaler is renting a tempo for transport of goods, going ahead they will be able to claim the tax paid on the rental and receive it as input credit. They will thus be able to reduce the final market price of the transported goods by making up for that amount.
  • Financial streamlining: Because the entire supply value chain including tax flows will be on GST records, wholesalers will be better connected to retailers and suppliers. For example, the payment for a consignment will reflect in the accounting records of the supplier company as well as the wholesaler, leaving no ambiguity about payables and receivables. This will make it easier to process payments and get tax returns in a timely manner, thereby improving the cash flows of traders. A reliable positive cash flow will help build confidence in the new regime, by making working capital available and aiding opportunities to grow the business.
  • Reorganization of supply chain: GST will enable high visibility and streamlining of the supply chain, providing wholesalers with a transparent view of supply movements. For example, taxation at the “place of supply” is already mobilizing FMCG companies establish fewer warehouses, the sizes of which will be larger than before. This will aid business efficiency in the long run. However, in the initial transition phase, many wholesalers may undergo de-stocking since they would have already paid VAT on their current stocks, and would like to avail of the input tax credit on the basis of the GST rules.
  • Ease of borrowing through digital lending: Because financial and tax transactions will now be recorded in the GST system, even small traders will have digital records of their company finances and credit status. These digital records will act as a ready reckoner of information when a trader opts for a loan. Financial institutions and online lenders like Capital Float can now easily assess the loan eligibility of small traders such as Kirana owners by accessing this data, and provide them quick and easy loans. Borrowing funds online and doing business will now be easier.

2. For Retailers:

Almost 92% of the retail sector in India is unorganised, operating in cash payments. They are, essentially, the tangible representation of FMCG multinationals to end-consumers; yet they are challenged by chronic issues such as the lack of technology enablement and low operating margins. A majority of the retail market consists of “kirana stores”, which are often the smallest link of the trade chain.

Here are the benefits of the new taxation system for retailers.

  • Input tax credit facility: As mentioned for wholesalers, retailers too would be able to claim taxes paid for input products and services availed. This will present a cost advantage to retailers. For example, under the previous tax regime, if a retailer purchases a refrigerator to store perishable goods, they were not able to claim credit for tax paid on it. Under GST, they will be able to claim the tax paid on the new refrigerator when they file their taxes. This will be possible due to tax connections reflecting in the GST value chain at each stage of the transaction. Availing input tax credit means financial gain.
  • Ease of entry into the market: The market is expected to become more business-friendly due to the clarity of processes related to procurement of raw materials and better supply logistics. This is a good opportunity for new suppliers, distributors and vendors to enter the market. The registration process has also become very clear under the GST, aiding entry into the market.
  • Retailer empowerment through information availability: Small retailers often do not have complete visibility into their stock receipts, payments, etc. and are forced to blindly rely on the word of the supplier. GST will streamline these supply and cost challenges and empower the retailer with readily available information through digital systems. For example, when different types of bills like invoices, credit and debit notes, etc. are stored digitally as proposed by GST using accounting software, these will provide retailers with real-time reports on sales, stock information and live balance sheets, in addition to performing error checks before placing an entry into ledgers.
  • Better borrowing opportunity: The retailer scope for business growth can be increased by increasing the retailers’ access to finance. This is where Fintech lenders like Capital Float step in – they can ease their passage to the new tax regime. Capital Float recognises the financial challenges these small business players face and strives to bridge this gap by financing them with small ticket loans. As “kiranas” move onto GSTN, Capital Float will be able to better serve this micro-entrepreneur segment, helping them overcome upcoming challenges by leveraging the GST-enabled digital footprint.

However, like any new reform, there are certain challenges that need to be addressed. We see that both retailers and wholesalers must manage the following eventualities of GST implementation.

!  Higher costs of input services: Input services such as manpower, legal, professional services, auditor services, travel expenses, etc. will now be taxed at 18% as against the earlier bracket of 15%, leading to higher costs to the wholesaler.

! Additional costs to upgrade technology: Many wholesalers, especially rural ones, are not technology-savvy and will need to rely on help from their supplier companies to undergo a technological transformation. This means that supplier companies may need to increase commissions for wholesalers— an added cost to the company, or wholesalers and retailers themselves will need to invest in new systems, incurring additional expenses.

3. For Importers and Exporters

According to the financial reports of 2016, India is the 16th largest export economy in the world with the net value of exports contributing to one-third of the GDP. The subsuming of various local state level taxes will have a direct impact on imports and exports, a critical component of trade. For example, the Countervailing Duty (CVD- an additional import duty levied to offset the effect of concessions or subsidies, currently 0% or 6% or 12%) and Special Additional Duty (SAD- a special kind of customs duty paid on imported goods currently at 4%) have been done away with under the new GST regime. However, Basic Customs Duty continues to be applicable and importers will need to pay it as per previous rates.

Here is a look at the overall impact of GST on trade:

  • Imports Taxation: Every import will be treated as an interstate supply, and will be subject to Integrated Goods and Services Tax (IGST) along with Basic Customs Duty (ranging between 5% and 40% depending on the good imported). This implies that IGST will be levied on any imported item, based on the value of the imported goods and any customs duty chargeable on the goods (say 10%). IGST is a combination of SGST (say 9%) and CGST (say 9%). For instance, for an import item worth Rs 10,000:
Total Duties + Taxes Payable Basic Customs Duty (10%) GST (18%) GST Cess(if applicable)
₹2800 ₹1000 ₹1800 Nil

Thus, imports taxation is an added tax liability for retailers who import goods or services.

  • Exports Taxation: Exports will be treated as zero-rated supply, i.e., no GST will be charged on exports. This is in line with the “Make in India” campaign that aims to make India a global manufacturing hub, for which exports are important.
  • Import of Services: The new clause of import of services places the onus of tax payments on the service receiver when the services are provided by a person residing outside India. This mechanism is called reverse charge and will apply in certain scenarios. For example, if the assessee has no physical presence in the taxable area, then the representative of the assesse will be required to pay tax. In the absence of representation, the assesse has to appoint a representative who will be liable to pay GST. Another example is when a registered dealer is buying goods or services from an unregistered dealer. In this case, the registered dealer will have to pay the tax on supply.
  • Need for restructuring working capital: A major shift is that GST is based on “transaction value” rather than MRP. In the old system, CVD was charged as a percentage of the MRP. Under GST, IGST will be charged as a percentage of the transaction value. This will affect the cash reserves of retailers and wholesalers, and they will need to reassess their working capital needs.

On the whole, GST is expected to bring domestic players at par with large multinational corporations due to the renewed import and export norms and the rules for FMCG suppliers. This is a good sign for Indian trade and exports in general, and thus the implementation of GST shows promise to propel India onto the international trade arena.Visit our GST blog to know more about GST and keep track of latest.

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Oct 24, 2018

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Tax Computation – 2 regimes

India’s Minister of Finance and Corporate Affairs Smt. Nirmala Sitharaman, on February 1, 2020 tabled the Union Budget for the FY 2020-21 in the Lok Sabha. She announced a new income tax regime in addition to the existing one, to provide relief to individual taxpayers. 

However, this new regime is optional and the taxpayers can choose between the old and the new, basis their suitability. The new regime has foregone certain deductions and exemptions. The tax rates have been reduced, but taxpayers will have to forego exemptions when choosing the new tax regime.

Let us take a look at the tax rates of individuals whose age is less than 60 years under both the regimes:

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-5 lakhs5%5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

From the above table, it is evident that the tax rates are lower in the new regime than the old regime. But, there is a list of exemptions and deductions that has to be conceded by the taxpayers. This list includes but is not limited to the following:

i) Leave Travel Allowance (LTA)

ii) Conveyance

iii) House Rent Allowance (HRA)

iv) Uniform Allowance

v) Helper allowance

vi) Professional tax

vii) Standard deduction

viii) Other special allowances [Section 10(14)]

ix) Interest on housing loan (Section 24) on self occupied property

x) Chapter VI-A deduction (80C,80D, 80E and so on) (Except Section 80CCD(2) and 80JJA)

Savings calculation based on income

PARTICULARSOld Tax Regime(Rs.)
Gross Income15,00,000
Less: Deductions- 
      U/S 80C (Investment in PPF)1,50,000
      U/S 80D (Medical Insurance – Self, spouse, children)25,000
      U/S 80TTA (Interest Income from Savings account on a bank)10,000
Taxable Income13,15,000

TAX ON TAXABLE INCOME (OLD TAX SLAB)(Rs.)(Rs.)
At normal rate, on the income of Rs. 13,15,000:  
Up to 2.5 lakhsNil 
2.5-5 lakhs @5%12,500 
5-7.5 lakhs @20%50,000 
7.5-10 lakhs @20%50,000 
10-12.5 lakhs @30%75,000
12.5-13.15 lakhs @30%19,500 
Total 2,07,000
Add: Cess @4% on Rs. 2,07,000 8,280
Tax Liability 2,15,280

From the above illustration, it is evident that taxpayers can reduce their taxable income by investing in tax saving instruments such as Provident Fund, Medical Insurance, etc. that appear as deductions under section 80C to 80U of the Income Tax Act, 1961.

PARTICULARSNew Tax Regime (Rs.)
Gross Income15,00,000
Less: DeductionsNil
Taxable Income15,00,000

TAX ON TAXABLE INCOME (NEW TAX SLAB)(Rs.)(Rs.)
At normal rate, on the income of Rs. 15,00,000:  
Up to 2.5 lakhsNil 
2.5-5 lakhs @5%12,500 
5-7.5 lakhs @10%25,000 
7.5-10 lakhs @15%37,500 
10-12.5 lakhs @20%50,000 
12.5-15 lakhs @25%62,500 
Total 1,87,500
Add: Cess @4% on Rs. 1,87,500 7,500
Tax Liability 1,95,000

From the above illustration, having regard to the income level and the deductions being claimed by the taxpayer, it is possible that taxpayers can save money because of the low tax rates of the new regime, however the same needs to be evaluated on a case-to-case basis.

Tax rates under both the regimes for senior citizens

Tax rates for individuals whose age is 60 years or more but less than 80 years (Senior citizens):

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-3 lakhsNil5%
3-5 lakhs5%5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

Tax rates for individuals whose age is 80 years or more (Super senior citizens):

Income tax slabsTax rate (Old Regime)Tax rate (New Regime)
Up to 2.5 lakhsNilNil
2.5-5 lakhsNil5%
5-7.5 lakhs20%10%
7.5-10 lakhs20%15%
10-12.5 lakhs30%20%
12.5-15 lakhs30%25%
Above 15 lakhs30%30%

The Government has offered two types of regimes for tax computations for individuals– the old and the new system. The taxpayers should scrutinize and study both systems before opting for one. They should take into consideration their salaries, expenditures, savings, etc to select the system that is suitable for them. 

Disclaimer: This blog post is based on the provisions of the Finance Act,2020 as passed by the Parliament. Any subsequent notifications have not been factored into this post.

Oct 24, 2018

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Projections for the Future: Top 5 Small Business Trends in 2018

Thriving amidst difficult environments has never been easy for SMEs in India, but they continue to stand tall. Despite numerous challenges in the form of infrastructural constraints and lack of access to formal credit, they contribute to 8% of the GDP. Rightly called ‘the engine of growth’ for India, SMEs have scaled manufacturing capabilities, reduced regional disparities and balanced the distribution of wealth.

Small businesses are now being increasingly associated with innovation and employment, and the figures state likewise. The micro, small and medium enterprise(MSME) sector contributes to 69% of employment in India. With the growing penetration of technology into mainstream ecosystem, these industries are at the forefront of bringing the convenience of digitalization to the masses.

The Indian economy is expected to be a $5 trillion economy by 2025, and SMEs are cutting roads towards this goal. As we enter the first financial year post implementation of GST, some interesting small business trends are touted to play an important role for a smoother growth journey to global standards.

Here are the latest business trends that you can keep in mind while setting your objectives for FY 2018-19.

Business Trend 1: Rise of Online B2B Marketplaces

E-commerce marketplaces are gradually gaining momentum worldwide, and has branched out to B2B trading platforms. While this is still at an embryonic stage in India, there is no doubt that the potential it holds is huge. According to experts, the scope of the ecommerce B2B industry is six times bigger than the B2C industry, and is estimated to be worth $620 billion industry by 2020.

Companies such as Amazon Business, Alibaba, IndiaMart, Power2SME, etc. are popular online platforms that connect B2B buyers and suppliers to fulfill their business requirements. These digital platforms have helped small businesses surpass technical and geographical limitations to procure raw materials in bulk at reduced prices and also become official supply partners to large corporations. This is one of the hottest small business trends of 2018 that will present aspiring as well as budding entrepreneurs a level playing field with industry leaders.

Business Trend 2: Personalized Customer Outreach via Automated Tech

With the oldest of the millennials attaining 35 years of age this year, the target audience has shifted by a generation. For an age bracket that has been wrought in technology, this band of consumers need more than online communication. They seek a personalized line of contact when availing services from small businesses, with 60% of them choosing emails as a preferred way to establish this connect.

Since the millennial generation has the highest buying power in the market valued at $44 billion globally, this is one audience you don’t want to miss out on. You can target them by leveraging interactive videos, engaging images, and emails customized with these elements for varying demographics. The use of intelligent virtual communication applications will help you implement this in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

Business Trend 3: Easy Access to Business Credit with FinTech Lenders

The biggest hurdle for small business owners has always been financing. For a country with 50 million SMEs, there is an unmet credit deficit of a staggering $350 billion. Traditional lending institutions are limited by conventional underwriting that caters only to a certain strata of businesses. Lack of collateral, documentation and operational history have been crippling factors that prevented SMEs from qualifying for formal finance. This, in turn, pushed SMEs to the informal sector where the high interest rates charged by moneylenders fettered borrowers to a chronic cycle of debt.

But, FinTech lenders are shifting the narrative by leveraging technology and unconventional data points to provide affordable loans to small businesses as well as consumers. With customized credit products and zero collateral requirement, these digital financiers bridge the gap that had long existed in the market.

Business Trend 4: Big Data to Drive Operations and Decisions

‘Is Big Data too big for SMEs?’- is a question that requires intensive analysis, depending on the goals that define the small business and its operations. Many SMEs see big data projects as unapproachable and sophisticated, owing to the difficulties inherent in understanding huge datasets. However, studies reveal that a calculated use of big data has a colossal impact on the growth of small businesses and has been the chassis for many popular business models.

This business trend is expected to revolutionize the SME sector by speeding its pace of development. New-age digital lenders do finance technological incorporations if it shows a direct correlation to business growth, so you needn’t worry about the funds for investing in Big Data. Check out Unsecured Business Loans for more details.

Business Trend 5: Shifted Focus on IT Security

2017 saw one of the largest cyberattack worldwide, the WannaCry ransomware attack, that caused the encryption of data on computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system and risked the exposure of sensitive data of companies in over 150 countries. Though the attack was stopped within a few days of discovery, the total damages were estimated to be in billions of dollars.

The IT industry in India contributes to a key part of the country’s economy, a significant number of enterprises will begin to invest in dedicated security systems that focus on detection and response, a shift away from conventional systems that were based on prevention. Security enhancements offered by SaaS/Cloud based platforms have become more affordable for small businesses to establish a dominant architecture for data integrity management.

Oct 24, 2018