Implications of GST on Manufacturing

GST — the unified tax system that is set to revolutionize indirect taxation in India— is finally here. Some of its key proposed advantages are streamlining of tax payments, reduction in tax frauds, and ease of doing business. Here is a look at how these will play out in the manufacturing domain.

Make In India & Manufacturing

The manufacturing sector in India contributes a mere 16% to the overall GDP. However, the potential to make this a high-growth and high-GDP sector is huge. The “Make in India” campaign by Prime Minister Narendra Modi makes this possibility real, by giving impetus to the sector. Furthermore, PwC estimates that India will become the fifth largest manufacturing country in the world by the end of 2020. It would be interesting to know how the Goods and Services Tax or GST impacts this roadmap.

Impact of GST on Manufacturing

GST is one of the key policy changes that will have a direct impact on manufacturing establishments. So far, the existing complex tax structure has been a dampener, resulting in the slow growth of the sector. GST is expected to liberate the sector by unifying tax regimes across states.

Overall, GST is expected to have a positive impact and boost manufacturing.  Here is why:

  • Removal of multiple valuations will create simplification: The old tax regime subjects manufactured goods to excise duty, which is calculated differently in different states. While some states calculate excise duty based on transaction value, others calculate it based on quantity. Most manufactured goods’ excise duty is currently considered on MRP valuation. This creates great confusion in valuation methods. GST will usher in an era of transaction-based valuation, making calculation of tax much simpler for the manufacturer.
  • Entry tax subsummation will reduce cost of production: The subsuming of the entry tax for inter-state transfers is a key reason for reducing cost of goods and services. For example, a supplier of cement from Maharashtra to Karnataka was earlier required to pay entry tax when the supply crossed the interstate border. For Karnataka, the entry tax rate was 5% of the value of the goods. The supplier would pass on this additional cost to the customer, resulting in increase in selling price. With entry tax being subsumed, the supplier need not pay the entry tax rate amount and consequently, not charge the customer this amount either.
  • Improved cash flows: Under the new tax laws, manufacturers can claim input tax credit on input goods, which seems to be a positive sign for cash flow. SMEs are keenly observing the time difference between input tax credit and the credit being available.
  • Single registration process will provide ease of registration: The old regime required manufacturers to register each manufacturing facility separately, even those in the same state. GST will simplify the plant registration process by allowing single registration for all manufacturing entities within the same state. Previously, if a brick manufacturer had factories in Bangalore, Hubli and Dharwad, each unit had to be registered separately. Under GST, all of these factories would be jointly registered under the state of Karnataka. Of course, different state-entities will require separate registrations under GST too.
  • Removal of cascading will lead to lower cost-to-consumer: The old tax regime does not allow manufacturers to claim tax credit on inter-state transaction taxes such as octroi, central sales tax, entry tax etc. This results in cascading of taxes—an extra cost to the manufacturing company. Manufacturers end up passing on these extra costs to the consumer. The unified GST regime will eliminate multiple taxes and thus lower cost of production; this, in turn, will mean lower pricing for the consumer. For example, prior to 1 July 2017, SMEs in manufacturing used to pay Excise Duty, Central State Tax and sometimes VAT too at 12.5%, 2% and 5.5% respectively. With GST in effect, they are required to pay 18% in taxes.
  • Restructuring of supply chain: To align with the GST law, businesses will be required to realign their supply chains. However, this is a blessing in disguise. Till date, most supply chain structuring has been designed around how to manage tax regimes. With a single tax regime, this will change, and supply chain structures will focus on driving business efficiencies. An example is that of warehousing. The old regime demands that warehouse management be based on arbitrage between varying VAT rates across states. This is expected to change to bring in economic efficiencies and more customer-centricity going ahead.

Manufacturers, however, are concerned about the following aspects:

  • Increase in immediate working capital requirements: Branch transfers and depo transfers will be treated as taxable under GST; IGST will be applicable on these transfers. This increases the requirement for immediate working capital. Another reason for increased working capital requirements is that the receipt of advance is taxable as per GST rules. Also, stock transfers are treated as “supply” and hence are taxable under the GST regime.
  • More stringent and elaborate transaction management: GST aims to achieve better tax compliance. To make this possible, manufacturers must work towards streamlining existing transactions; this means additional resources and costs. For example, under GST, credit in respect to an invoice can be taken only up to one year of the invoice date. Also, the provision of reverse charge means that the liability to pay tax falls on the recipient of goods/services instead of the supplier. The payment of reverse charge is dependent on the time of supply (30 days from the date of issue of invoice by the supplier in case of goods and 60 days for services).These changes will require manufacturers to carefully assess and track their supply processes, especially the timelines. This may mean hiring a better skilled compliance workforce, and better systems and software. More legal considerations will also mean more costs.
  • Lack of clarity on local exemptions: Despite GST being proposed as a unifying platform for indirect tax, all the components for manufacturing are not yet clear. One such area is localized area-based exemptions. The old structure provides certain exemptions for certain goods in specific states (for example the North East or hilly states). Under GST, most of these exemptions are likely to be removed, resulting in a negative cost-impact on these manufacturers. Such companies must reassess their financial position in view of such likely changes.

Overall, one can say that the impact of GST on the manufacturing sector is positive. It provides a unique opportunity to streamline business operations to become more compliance and profitability-oriented, rather than tax-oriented. It puts power in the hands of business leaders to bring about positive change and steer their enterprises on a growth path, powered by GST-compliance.

Read more of our content on GST by clicking here.

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Revised GST Rates – with effect from 25 January 2018

The 25th GST Council was held on 18 January 2018, and the rates of 29 goods and 53 services were reduced to lower tax slabs. These revised rates came into effect on 25 January. Other highlights of the panel included the decision to divide between the Centre and State, collections worth ₹35,000 crores from the Integrated Goods and Services Tax. The proposal to bring petroleum and diesel products under the ambit of GST is likely to be considered in the next meeting.

Here are the key goods and services that have been lowered or raised into new GST slabs.  

Good/Service Present GST Rates Revised GST Rates
Diamonds & precious stones 3% 0.25%
Articles of straw, esparto or other plaiting materials, Velvet fabric 12% 5%
LPG supplied to household domestic consumers, Raw materials and consumables needed for launch vehicles, satellites and payloads, Tamarind kernel powder, Mehendi paste in cones, Tailoring services, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products, job-work services for manufacture of leather goods and footwear 18% 5%
Sugar boiled confectionery, Drinking water packed in 20 litre bottles, Biodiesel, Drip irrigation system including laterals & sprinklers, Mechanical sprayer, Fertilizer grade Phosphoric acid, Bamboo wood building joinery, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products with ITC credit, Metro and monorail projects, Common effluent treatment plants services for treatment of effluents, Mining or exploration services of petroleum crude and natural gas and for drilling services in respect of the said goods 18% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles(other than medium & large cars and SUVs) with a condition than no ITC is availed 28% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles [medium and large cars and SUVs] with a condition that No ITC is availed, Public transport buses that run on biofuel, Services by way of admission to theme parks, water parks, joy rides, merry-go-rounds, go-karting and ballet 28% 18%
Small housekeeping service providers, notified under section 9 (5) of GST Act, who provide housekeeping service through ECO,  without availing ITC nil 5%
Actionable claim in the form of chance to win in betting and gambling including horse racing nil 28%
Rice bran(other than de-oiled rice bran) 0% 5%
Cigarette filter rods 12% 18%

Oct 24, 2018

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What Is GST And How To Register For It

India is all set to implement the Goods and Services Tax, or the GST, from July 1, 2017. The intent is to standardise the indirect taxation system in the country, related to the supplies and consumption of goods and services. The new regime is one of the biggest indirect tax reforms pan-India, and one that will directly affect both business owners and consumers to a marked degree. It is thus important to know the whats and hows of the GST rollout.

What is GST?

GST is a new system for indirect taxation. Under this, a new four-tier tax structure has been finalised. Goods and services will be taxed under the slabs of 5%, 12%, 18% or 28%. The highest slab is for luxury items and items such as tobacco. The Union Cabinet has passed four bills for four different categories of tax regimes under the GST, as follows:

Central GST Bill: Applies to the supply of goods and services by the Central government within the boundaries of a state.

Integrated GST Bill: Applies to the supply of goods and services between different states, carried out by the Central Government.

Union Territory GST Bill: Applies to the supply of goods and services in the Union Territories.

The Compensation Bill: An allied bill that will govern the provision of compensation for revenue losses brought on by GST implementation, over a period of five years from implementation.

These four bills together are set to change the tax norms in the country.

Advantages of GST

The GST will prove advantageous at both seller and consumer levels. According to our Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, GST has the potential to boost economic growth by as much as two percentage points. From a business perspective, a number of pros are evident.

Greater compliance: The GST implementation will be reinforced by a backbone of robust IT systems and processes. All taxpayer services will be available online, making tax compliance and operations simple and transparent.

Uniform tax rates: This will ensure that tax structures and rates are common across the country, and will consequently make cross-locational business easier and quicker.

Reduce overlap: Often, a single product, for example, a shirt, being sold is taxed at various stages. With VAT, excise duty and other taxes payable at different stages, payments often roll up to large numbers, posing a cost to the company. The GST will facilitate the removal of different layers of tax levies and will replace them with a single, clear interface.

Cost advantage: Under the GST practice, many local Central and State taxes will be subsumed. At the Central level, the Central Excise Duty, Additional Excise Duty, Service Tax, Countervailing Duty and Special Additional Customs Duty will be subsumed. At the State level, we will see the following getting subsumed: State Value Added Tax or Sales Tax, Entertainment Tax, Octroi, Purchase Tax, and Luxury Tax, to name a few. These measures will reduce the cost of manufactured goods or services, thereby increasing the competitiveness of Indian goods in an increasingly global market.

The end consumer also stands to benefit from the following:

Better tax clarity and planning: Often, consumers are not aware of the taxes that they pay on the purchased goods or services, either due to the confusion caused by multiple indirect taxes or because the tax component is not revealed in the selling price. Such taxes may mask the real cost. GST will help streamline this by having only one tax applied from manufacturer to consumer, enabling tax transparency.

Lesser tax burdens: A single rollout across the nation is bound to bring in efficiency gains. At the same time, a transparent tax process with fewer hidden taxes will help reduce taxes for most commodities, leading to better affordability for the consumer.

The next steps for businesses: Applying for GST

Every business that is currently registered under any existing tax regime has to compulsorily migrate to GST. If your business is not registered under any tax regime, then you have to register for GST only if your aggregate turnover in a financial year exceeds a threshold limit of 20 lakhs liability for payment of tax (10 lakhs for North Eastern states).

If your business is happening inter-state or through e-commerce as an intermediary supplier, then registration is mandatory, even if this threshold limit is not reached. However, note that any casual taxable person or non-resident person is liable to register for GST even if they are not crossing the threshold limit.

Registration/ enrollment for GST is to be completed online under the GST Common Portal https://www.gst.gov.in/ for both taxpayers and businesses. This will be the platform for future filing of returns and tax payments. The government has also appointed GST Suvidha Providers to help with the process. There is no offline process for GST enrolment.

The enrolment is free. In order to log in for the first time into the portal, you must have your username and password that you would have received from the State VAT or Centre Tax Department (these are linked to your PAN). For further logins, create your username and password and begin the enrollment process.

These are the steps to follow for registration:

  1. Fill in Form GST REG-01-Part A, and key in the PAN number, mobile number and email address. The PAN will be verified online while the mobile number and email ID will be verified through the one-time password (OTP).
  2. The applicant will then receive an application reference number along with an acknowledgement of application through FORM GST REG-02.
  3. The applicant must fill the Form GST REG-01-Part B with the applicant’s reference number. The applicant must attach required documents: PAN card, documentation of company such as partnership deed, memorandum of association or incorporation certificate, proof of business such as rent agreement or electricity bill, cancelled cheque of company bank account in the account holder’s name, and proof of key authorised signatories such as list of directors or list of partners with their ID and address proof.
  4. If any additional information is required, the applicant will receive Form GST REG-03 as notification and must fill in and submit Form GST REG-04 within seven days.
  5. On submitting all details correctly, the application will be approved and the applicant will receive their registration certificate, called Form GST REG-06. However, if the application is rejected, Form GST REG-05 is sent to the applicant and they will be required to resubmit an application through Form GST REG-07, only if they need to deduct TDS or collect TCS.

This completes the registration process. It is followed by the issuance of a Provisional Registration Certificate (if approved), and thereafter, a final Registration Certificate that is expected to be issued within six months of the documents being verified by the GST authorities. Remember that different business verticals/locations need to be registered separately, as the registration certificate is generated separately for each.

Currently, the portal states that more than 60 lakh taxpayers have enrolled on the GST Portal between November 08, 2016 and April 30, 2017. Please note that the enrolment process has closed from May 1, 2017, and will reopen at a later date. Visit our GST blog to know more about GST and keep track of latest

Oct 24, 2018

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Importance of Working Capital for Businesses

What is Working Capital?

Working capital is the difference between the total number of assets and the total number of liabilities in a company. This amount is spent on executing day-to-day operations in a business. As a result, it is used as an index to measure the health of a company. Enterprises with high working capital are often strong businesses.

What are the Uses of Working Capital?

In most situations, working capital is used to run operations. A well-managed business will also use it’s working capital to achieve growth. For instance, an online seller would spend to add a new type of product to his portfolio. A retailer may liquidate funds to increase his store size by adding a new section to his outlet.
Other uses of working capital include:
• Equipment and inventory purchases
• Hiring, salary payments and employee training
• Unforeseen expenses

What are the Outcomes of Low Working Capital?
Responsible financial management may help companies secure higher levels of working capital. On the contrary, poor management of capital could result in the following issues:

• Bankruptcy risk: In the case of negative working capital, SMEs use money received from creditors to finance business operations. Businesses run the risk of bankruptcy due to the lack of sufficient income to counterbalance the expenditure.

• Lack of investment opportunities: Investors are less likely to consider companies which regularly have low or negative working capital. This demonstrates that the company is not being run effectively.

• Missed growth opportunities: With large amounts of positive working capital, businesses will have money to spend on pursuing growth. With negative or low working capital, businesses may find it difficult to capitalize on investment opportunities. Low working capital could have stifling effects on the ambitions of any businessman.

• Trade discounts: Many suppliers will offer substantial discounts if they are paid on time. Low or negative working capital can make it difficult to meet payment obligations which, effectively, increases the cost of inventory.

What are the Ways of Accessing Working Capital Finance with Capital Float?

At Capital Float, we offer a wide range of financing options for small and medium scale businesses. By providing quick and easier access to funds and with flexible repayment options, we can give businesses the right financial support to help them achieve their next milestone.

We offer Online Seller Finance to e-commerce sellers who operate on online marketplaces. Through a simple online process, the seller can apply for a loan and receive funds in three days. The loan tenure ranges between 90-180 days and is repaid on a biweekly basis. This loan is ideal for sellers who are looking at expanding into other marketplaces, increasing their product portfolio or purchasing higher volumes of stock.

Term Finance is applicable for traditional businesses that have been operating for three years. The loan tenure varies between six months to three years. Small scale manufacturers, retailers and distributors can use this loan to meet short-term investment requirements and finance inventory purchases.

Invoice Finance helps SMEs convert their invoices into cash, that can be channeled into financing business operations. This loan product has an exclusive feature of one-time bullet repayment mode, which might suit the cash-flow needs of several SMEs.

We also provide Merchant Cash Advance which will interest vendors using point-of-sale machines with consistent card settlements. Merchants can receive working capital finance of up to 150% of their monthly card swipes within three days of the loan application.

Our unique product called ‘Pay Later’ is a rolling credit facility, that enables the borrower to make multiple drawdowns within a predefined credit limit. The borrower pays interest on the utilized amount and not on the entire limit. By repaying the amount utilized, the borrower resets the credit limit, thereby instantly availing the facility in whole. Click here to read more about ‘Pay Later’. You could read about the product features by clicking here.

At Capital Float, we have working capital finance options for SMEs across all segments. Visit our website to know more about all our products. Click here to apply now.

Oct 24, 2018