Impact of the Union Budget 2018 on MSMEs

MSME is an important sector for the Government, as it maintains a relentless focus on increasing GDP and employment. Formalization of MSME businesses is being undertaken on a massive scale after demonetization and the introduction of GST. The core focus of the Union Budget 2018 indicates the Government’s commitment to continue strengthening MSMEs from the base of the sector.

Lending a Hand to MSMEs

With the Union Budget 2018-19 in play, the refinancing policy and eligibility criteria under Micro Units Development and Refinance Agency (MUDRA) program will be reviewed to encourage easier financing of MSMEs by NBFCs.  The Government has set a target of ₹3,00,000 crores for loans to be provided under MUDRA in 2018-19. Specific measures to address NPAs of MSMEs were promised to ease the cash flow challenges that they face.  The tax burden on MSMEs has been reduced by axing tax rate to 25% for those with revenues of below ₹250 crores. Recapitalization of PSU banks will add an additional ₹5,00,000 crores to the available lending pool this year. A unique Aadhaar-like identity for each enterprise is planned for streamlining business identity. This measure can enable Fintech lenders to process eKYC of enterprises swiftly and offer working capital finance in a matter of minutes. Furthermore, the Finance Minister Arun Jaitley called out Fintech lenders in his speech and emphasised their importance in financing the development of MSMEs in India.

Operation Greens

A five-year tax holiday was granted to Farmer Producer Organisations (FPO) with a turnover below ₹100 crores to encourage post-harvest value addition. The Government has also promised a Minimum Support Price (MSP) crop of 1.5 times the production cost to farmers. In addition, several proposed measures related to the farm sector include – funds to develop agricultural markets, improve agricultural logistics, enhance rural connectivity, and distribute Kisan credit cards to farmers in fisheries and animal husbandry sectors. This sets the precedent for these sectors to create a digital footprint, facilitating them to receiving customized finance in the future from digital lenders like Capital Float.

The Finance Minister proposed to extend the tax relaxation period to 150 days to footwear and leather industry to boost the creation of employment at the grassroots level. An additional ₹10,000 crores have been allocated for fisheries, animal husbandry and aquaculture industries.  This is expected to aid more micro-segments in being included in the formal financial ecosystem

New Financing Avenues

In a bid to help start-ups and venture capital firms to attract foreign investments in niche areas, the Government will evolve a coherent and integrated policy for ODI (Outward Direct Investment) and hybrid instruments. The basket of eligible FDI instruments will be expanded to include these under certain conditions.

Taking a Position on Crypto Assets

The Government has reiterated that it is illegal to transact using cryptocurrencies, though it does not categorically state that it is illegal to hold these assets.  The Government will intensify its efforts to eliminate illicit transactions in cryptocurrencies. It also proposes to explore the use of Blockchain technology to enable more transparent payment mechanisms to boost the digital economy further. These efforts certainly forward the shift of business transactions from being paper-based to paperless, while adding clarity on which methods of digital payment are acceptable and which aren’t.

MSME – Key to India’s Industrial Growth

MSME sector plays a key role in India’s journey towards becoming the 5th largest economy in the world. Several measures to ease cash flow have been proposed which are likely to make lending more readily available to MSMEs. With Fintech lenders leading the charge on the financing front, MSMEs can be expectant to receive timely credit support to actualize their business ambitions and achieve remarkable growth this year. Several micro-segments are also expected to be absorbed into the formal financial system, as Fintech lenders like Capital Float continue to champion for the cause of financial inclusion in India.

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Budget 2017: Giving SMEs a stronger footing

SMEs play a crucial role in the economic development of India. They contribute to 45% of the industrial output, 40% of the exports and 42% of the employment in the country. Although these enterprises are highly significant to the economy, they are regularly challenged by policies, laws and processes In recognition of this, the Union Budget 2017 gave start-ups and SMEs a lot to cheer about.

Increasing Financial Viability with a Lower Tax Burden

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley announced a reduction in corporate tax from 30% to 25% for SMEs with an annual turnover of less than ₹50 crores. Moreover, the presumptive tax rate for SMEs with an annual turnover of up to ₹2 crores has been lowered from 8% to 6%. Both these measures would increase the bottom-line of SMEs. These enterprises work on low profits, and their survival is often threatened by even minor fluctuations in the business. The enhanced financial viability would increase the survival rate of SMEs.

At the same time, Budget 2017 has tried to align with the broader objective of increased digitalization. The proposed reduction in presumptive tax is applicable only for a firm’s gross receipts that are received via digital transactions. Also, no cash transaction above ₹3 lakhs would be permitted going forward. Both these measures have been designed to increase transparency and widen the tax base through digitalization.

Much Needed Breaks

Start-ups need maximum support during their initial years. From the next fiscal year, start-ups would have to pay taxes for only three out of seven years, up from last year’s exemption limit of five years, if they recorded profits. This is a great opportunity for start-ups and the economy. While a huge percentage of start-ups fail, these enterprises are responsible for introducing the most innovative products and services. The tax break announced by the Finance Minister would give start-ups a better fighting chance of survival and encourage more innovative ideas to be executed well.

Loans, Financing & Funding

The Finance Minister doubled the lending target to ₹2.44 lakh crores for the next fiscal year, making more credit available to small businesses to finance their working capital needs. Prime Minister Narendra Modi had already announced, on December 31, an increase in government credit guarantees for SMEs from ₹1 crore to ₹2 crores.

The FIPB (Foreign Investment Promotion Board) is to be abolished in the upcoming fiscal year. This would significantly liberalize policy related to FDI (Foreign Direct Investment). This is expected to boost retail and ecommerce in the country. Mr. Jaitley mentioned that further FDI relaxations were under consideration.

Most traditional banks are unwilling to give loans to SMEs due to the fear of defaults. Tax concession on provisions for non-performing assets (NPAs) and capital infusion of ₹10,000 crores for state-owned lenders would make loans more accessible to SMEs.

To encourage more investments into start-ups, the condition of continuous holding of 51% voting rights has been relaxed for carrying forward of losses by start-ups, provided the founder remains invested in the business.

Building on Digital India

While saying the almost 125 lakh people had adopted the BHIM digital payment app, the Finance Minister announced two new schemes – cashback for merchants and referral bonus for individuals.

Aadhaar Pay, the merchant version of the Aadhaar Enabled Payment System (AEPS), is to be launched shortly. This app would enable consumers to make payments without using cards, e-wallets or even mobile phones, since the merchant’s device would be linked to an Aadhaar biometric reader. More than a billion people in India already have Aadhaar cards, and this system would make most financial transactions simple, fast and traceable. It would be a boon for raising loans, enabling fintech lenders to link repayment to payments received by the SME.

The government would be targeting ₹2500 crore digital transactions in FY18 through BHIM, Aadhaar Pay, IMPS and debit cards. The Finance Minister indicated that banks would have to introduce 10 lakh new point-of-sale (PoS) terminals by March and 20 lakh Aadhaar-based PoS terminals by September, allowing more digital transactions, which would enhance financial inclusion and transparency.

Infrastructure

For the upcoming fiscal year, the Finance Minister announced a step-up in the total allocation for infrastructure development to an all-time high of ₹3.96 lakh crores, including increased allocations for railways, road and shipping. Infrastructural development eases a huge bottleneck faced by SMEs in transporting their goods to other regions in a timely and cost-effective manner. Better infrastructure would give confidence to SMEs to expand their markets farther and reduce wastage and spoilage during transportation.

Moreover, the roll out of GST (Goods and Services Tax), which the Finance Minister indicated was tracking as planned, would further increase the ease of doing business in other states.

An allocation of ₹10,000 crores towards the Bharat Net project was announced. This would increase access to high-speed broadband across India, facilitating communication and allowing SMEs to reach out to clients located in various corners of the country in a cost-efficient way. The geographic scale achieved will help SMEs to break physical boundaries and leverage bigger opportunities for growth.

The latest Union Budget comes as a respite for start-ups and SMEs. The strengthening of these businesses would play a critical role in India’s transition to becoming an economic superpower.

Oct 24, 2018

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What You Need to Know about the GST Impact on Pharma and Healthcare Industry?

The pharmaceutical and healthcare industry is a significant sector for the Indian economy. In terms of the volume of generic medicines produced, India is the third largest producer in the world and its rank in terms of the industry’s value stands at fourteen. The healthcare segment is expected to reach a valuation of $150 billion by the end of 2017. Like every other industry of the economy, the impact of GST is bound to be felt on the pharma industry as well.

To begin with, as different indirect taxes will be subsumed in a single tax, it will simplify the taxation system. Going further, the GST will affect the pricing, working capital, contracts with vendors, the ERP systems and internal processes in the sector.

To understand the GST impact on pharma companies, we need to be aware of the entire range of the pharmaceutical supply chain. At one end are pharma product manufacturers, contract and API manufacturers and the organisations that market the products in different parts of India. At the other end is a chain of Carrying and Forwarding Agents (C&F), distributors/wholesalers and retailers.

Two key parameters have changed in the pharma industry on account of GST. One is the manufacturing price, because many raw materials for medicines have been shifted from the 5% VAT bracket to the 12% GST bracket. Secondly, many medicinal salts and compounds have been wholly moved from 5% VAT to 12% GST rate on pharma industry. Furthermore, a number of health supplements that were earlier in the 12.5% to 15% tax bracket are now in the 18% to 28% GST bracket. The net effect of all these changes will be a significant hike in the price of medicines.

For a deeper view of the GST impact on pharma industry, we also need to consider the margins at which the complete supply chain works. In this sector, the clearing and forwarding agent has a 4% to 6% margin on the maximum retail price (MRP) of medicines, the distributor works at 7% to 8% margin on the same and the retailer has a margin of 20% on a medicine’s MRP. With the imposition of GST, the pharma companies will need to pay extra for the manufacturing cost, because the cost of raw materials has increased. Eventually, the product’s MRP will be revised to absorb the total effect.

Meanwhile, the government has also taken some steps to control and cap the price of some critical medicines, salts & compounds. This will result in a loss of 2% to 3% for the pharmaceutical manufacturing and marketing companies, who now have to bear higher costs.

From the viewpoint of wholesalers and retailers, the earning margins may not drop immediately, and supplies will be stabilised soon. The bigger concern will be the inventory held by them, on which the new GST rates will apply, although these goods were bought at the older VAT rates. In this case, the distributors and retailers will lose about 3% to 4% on their entire inventory.

Will the GST impact on healthcare industry also influence medical tourism?

By October 2015, the medical tourism sector of India was estimated to have a value of US $3 billion. It was projected to grow to $7-$8 billion by 2020. A number of studies have shown that the cost of healthcare services in India combined with the travelling and accommodation costs is around 30% to 40% lesser than similar medical procedures in first world countries such as the US, Canada, Australia and most Western European countries. The boom in India’s medical tourism has helped to generate more returns for the healthcare industry.

The overall impact of GST on healthcare and medical tourism industry will be a mix of positives and negatives. The diagnostic services have not been burdened by the tax. There is also no tax on medical devices like hearing aids. However, a 5% GST rate has been applied on vaccines, cardiac stents, diagnostic test kits and dialysis equipment. The rate of GST for X-ray tubes, radiotherapy apparatus and surgical instruments will be 12% and for high-end medical equipment, an 18% tax rate will be applied. While patients located in India may end up paying a higher cost for some products and services, the medical tourism industry is expected to grow, as the comparative costs in a few other countries still give an advantage to India.

Yoga, meditation centres and organic living practices in India also attract tourists from other parts of the world. The country is a home to a myriad of alternative practices like Homeopathy, Ayurveda, Siddha and Acupuncture, which are popular among medical tourists. These give an edge to India over Asian countries like UAE, Oman, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand. However, the GST rate on Ayurvedic products has been raised to 12%. It attracted a levy of only about 5% in the pre-GST regime. This may impact the price of natural medicine products if the manufacturers decide to pass on the burden to customers. Visits to yoga classes will also be expensive, as it is yet another segment that has become taxable under GST.

Overall, the GST impact on healthcare and pharma industry is not fully established. The obvious benefit will be by way of reduced complexities and the consolidation of multiple taxes into a single rate. The negative impacts will be felt in the form of increased prices for customers and reduced margins for businesses in the supply chain. The GST Council is still deliberating over some reforms to alleviate the burden on the people affected.

Capital Float has been taking note of the changing conditions post the implementation of Goods and Services Tax on 01 July 2017. With the aim of promoting entrepreneurship in India, we maintain our convenient lending services to businesses in all the industries including the pharmaceutical and healthcare sector. We support the Make in India initiative and only happy to answer any query that you may have on the finance product that suits your business, loan interest rates and terms.

Oct 24, 2018

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6 Tips to Increase Your Working Capital

Suresh Tanwar owns a flourishing logistics, packaging, and transport business. He handles nearly all aspects of his company, from sales, marketing, operations, and customer service, to finances. Sooner or later, finance, especially the lack of working capital, tends to become a challenge. Suresh needs to invest in his growing business, like any other Small and Medium Enterprise (SME).

This scenario, common among India’s SMEs, calls for smart management of available monetary resources, ensuring that company has the required business capital to keep operations running . After all, the survival of a business is directly dependent on its ability to seize the next growth opportunity. Businesses also inevitably face situations of sudden, unforeseen expenses. If these working capital needs are not duly addressed, business operations can be affected and profit margins can drop.

Here are 7 tips for business owners like Suresh Tanwar to increase their working capital.

1. Try working capital financing

Procurement of a working capital loan through conventional banks is largely prohibitive, for several reasons. Often, small business owners have no collateral to offer against the loan being sought. This is a major reason why traditional financiers tend to reject loan applications from SMEs. Inflexible lending policies, laborious paperwork, and extremely slow disbursement times by banks also act as deterrents.

Faced with the recurring business costs, and the inability to acquire business capital via traditional bank loans and overdrafts, SMEs are quite likely to find themselves in a tight corner.

Working capital financing offers a constructive way out. An increasing number of SMEs are now opting to meet their working capital needs through lenders other than banks and traditional lending institutions. Capital Float is a digital finance company that funds small businesses. We have assisted manufacturers, B2B service providers, buyers, distributors, travel agents, and many other businesses with easy access to timely credit.

A range of custom financial products offered by Capital Float can help solve the problem of increasing working capital. Flexible, fast, friendly, and affordable, these loan offerings ensure borrowers have access to the requisite amount of business capital, right when they need it.

2.Explore e-procurement

The B2B e-commerce segment is seeing exponential growth in India. A report suggests that the growing presence of B2B e-commerce platforms has offered SMEs access to competitive pricing and has also reduced inventory costs by 40%. This serves to ease the business’ working capital needs considerably.

SMEs have also benefitted greatly from being connected digitally with buyers and sellers through e-procurement. Elimination of middlemen and their related costs means that they earn more revenue. Besides, a digital platform offers SMEs an added advantage of being able to negotiate with a wider base of suppliers. Finally, the process of e-procurement curtails spending.

3.Proactively manage inventory

SMEs need to replenish their inventory constantly. Earlier, there was a need to hold vast amounts of stock, putting pressure on working capital. Miscommunication within departments would also lead to stockpiling and increased costs.

However, rigorous stock checks coupled with e-procurement can bring down such needless expenditure. This greatly eases the burden on working capital. Active management of inventory eliminates the need for advance buying and helps you move towards just-in-time delivery of goods. Efficient inventory management thus holds the key to increasing business capital.

4.Keep track of collections

Businesses often face issues of delayed payments from customers. A smart business manager needs to get past excuses for delayed payments. Creating accurate and timely invoices goes a long way in avoiding deferred returns. Such receivables billing also helps avoid bad debts and cash crunches. Rigorous follow-ups on billing and collections will have a positive effect on the working capital as well.

5.Keeping suppliers happy

Timely payment to suppliers helps develop better working relationships, and works wonders for the business. Besides, it enables SMEs to negotiate better deals. Not being able to pay vendors on time results in a strained working relationship, which could cause delays in deliveries and poor quality of services. Naturally, this can wreak havoc on a business as delays and operational inefficiencies eat into working capital.

Keeping suppliers happy is likely to have added benefits for SMEs in the form of discounts that largely serve to ease the need for working capital. Courtesy early payment, bulk supply and/or regular orders become easier, ensuring that business capital isn’t affected, adding that much more to the liquidity of funds.

6.Keep expenses transparent

It is no mean task to run a business smoothly, especially when it comes to managing finances and having to put aside working capital to seize the next big opportunity. Even smaller hidden expenses can have a cumulative negative impact on an enterprise’s cash flow. Making expenses more visible therefore is an intelligent way of managing finances. This includes setting clear rules in areas such as travel and accommodation, deploying necessary tools to monitor expense claims, and so on.

Running into financial troubles is a given for any enterprise, big or small. How well a cash crunch is handled depends on how much cash a business has in its kitty for unexpected expenses. A financing firm like Capital Float enables enterprises across industries with quick and easy access to funds, to tide over times like these.

A trustworthy partner will walk that extra mile with people like Suresh Tanwar, and help them fulfill their entrepreneurial dreams. Capital Float has been serving SMEs for over 3 years, providing affordable loans, anytime, anywhere, in a manner that is customized to an SME’s business needs.

Oct 24, 2018