Revised GST Rates – with effect from 25 January 2018

The 25th GST Council was held on 18 January 2018, and the rates of 29 goods and 53 services were reduced to lower tax slabs. These revised rates came into effect on 25 January. Other highlights of the panel included the decision to divide between the Centre and State, collections worth ₹35,000 crores from the Integrated Goods and Services Tax. The proposal to bring petroleum and diesel products under the ambit of GST is likely to be considered in the next meeting.

Here are the key goods and services that have been lowered or raised into new GST slabs.  

Good/Service Present GST Rates Revised GST Rates
Diamonds & precious stones 3% 0.25%
Articles of straw, esparto or other plaiting materials, Velvet fabric 12% 5%
LPG supplied to household domestic consumers, Raw materials and consumables needed for launch vehicles, satellites and payloads, Tamarind kernel powder, Mehendi paste in cones, Tailoring services, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products, job-work services for manufacture of leather goods and footwear 18% 5%
Sugar boiled confectionery, Drinking water packed in 20 litre bottles, Biodiesel, Drip irrigation system including laterals & sprinklers, Mechanical sprayer, Fertilizer grade Phosphoric acid, Bamboo wood building joinery, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products with ITC credit, Metro and monorail projects, Common effluent treatment plants services for treatment of effluents, Mining or exploration services of petroleum crude and natural gas and for drilling services in respect of the said goods 18% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles(other than medium & large cars and SUVs) with a condition than no ITC is availed 28% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles [medium and large cars and SUVs] with a condition that No ITC is availed, Public transport buses that run on biofuel, Services by way of admission to theme parks, water parks, joy rides, merry-go-rounds, go-karting and ballet 28% 18%
Small housekeeping service providers, notified under section 9 (5) of GST Act, who provide housekeeping service through ECO,  without availing ITC nil 5%
Actionable claim in the form of chance to win in betting and gambling including horse racing nil 28%
Rice bran(other than de-oiled rice bran) 0% 5%
Cigarette filter rods 12% 18%

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First GST Whitepaper Exclusively for SMEs

We have created ‘GST- An Overview, Its Impact & Significance’ as a comprehensive GST handbook comprising of every aspect related to this new reform, with a special focus on Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). Starting with the salient features, this GST ebook takes readers through the three main components of the tax which eliminate the cascading effects of taxation. Further, the registration process, four-tiered tax structure, the benefits as well as challenges are explained in the GST whitepaper.

How this Whitepaper will help simplify GST for you

  • Revised GST Rates Update
  • Industry-wise Analysis of GST Impact
  • Clear, Brief Descriptions of Key Aspects
  • Easy Roadmap to Implement GST Changes
  • Business Advice by Financial Experts
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Oct 24, 2018

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Considerations While Applying For a Business Loan at a Financial Institution

New entrepreneurs with pioneering business ideas primarily need finance to keep their operations running. Banks have encouraged the growth of small-scale industries in India since independence by granting loans to promising ventures. However, the demand for funds did not quite keep up with the supply, and this resulted in the emergence of non-banking finance companies (NBFCs). The NBFCs supported the trend of industrialisation by granting business finance to those who could not procure it from banks.

The digital technology revolution in the second decade of the 21st century has given rise to a new breed of NBFC companies – the FinTech (financial technology) lenders. Employing a new models of lending, a FinTech company uses data analytics and social media tools to evaluate the creditworthiness of borrowers.

If you have begun a new venture and are seeking a loan for business expansion, you may have wondered who will be a more suitable lender – a bank or a digital NBFC. While there is more of interdependence than competition between these two sectors, you as the borrower have the privilege to choose what suits your interests the best. The loan that are you are eligible for will also be based on your business credit history and the availability of documents in support of the application.

Mentioned below are the points that will matter in the decision-making process:

Flexibility of sending application: At present, banks in India do not work on Sundays, second and fourth Saturdays and on gazetted holidays. Because you need to visit a bank branch in person while applying for business finance, it implies that there will be days when you cannot expect the process to advance towards the disbursal of your loan. Conversely, digital NBFCs by their very nature of operational medium can be accessed for business finance any day, any time. Therefore, Even if you are completely occupied with work on week days, you can apply for the business loan on a Saturday or Sunday and can still avail the loan within a time period as short as 3 days.

Loan processing time: Usually, it takes a few weeks before you actually get the required credit through a bank loan. Most of the banks in the public sector have to follow stringent rules in verifying the credibility of business organisations before they release funds into their accounts.

If you have an urgent need for money and cannot afford to wait for long, an NBFC loan from a FinTech player will be a better option. The entire line of processes from the submission of application to the disbursal of funds is digital and is therefore far quicker.

Collateral requirement: For years, banks have been lending to both individuals and businesses based on collateral that has to be pledged for security. This could be a residential or commercial property, gold holdings or any other asset that can be liquidated in case the borrower is unable to pay off the loan in the stipulated period. Even if a public sector bank looks at the regular income earnings of the borrower, it still requires collateral for additional assurance of getting back the amount lent with interest.

On the other hand, the NBFCs in digital lending industry do not ask for such guarantees through assets. They offer their loans solely on the creditworthiness of the business, which is evaluated by its dealings in the past and expertise in the field. If you are reluctant to offer collateral or simply do not have anything substantial to pledge, a FinTech company will still be willing to grant business loans in India.

Years in business: When was your business established? How old is your venture? For how many years has your business been up and running? Traditional lending institutions like banks ordinarily ask such questions when you apply for a loan through them. Generally, banks in public and private sector lend to organisations that have been operational for 3 to 5 years. Even conventional NBFCs require about the same duration before they can approve an application for a business loan. Such conditions however cannot be fulfilled by many start-ups.

The digital NBFCs have come to the rescue of enterprising individuals by granting loan for business even if their establishment has just completed a minimum operational period A one-year-old organisation with a convincing success story can persuade a FinTech company for business finance.

Nature of operations: Digital technology and social media have given rise to enterprises that were unheard of even in the late 20th century. Online platforms today sell everything from groceries and clothes to jewellery and appliances. Tickets for airlines, rail, buses and even tables in restaurants & hotel rooms are booked with a few taps on your smartphone. There are hundreds of other great business ideas that need to be uncovered. Banks and other traditional lending agencies have not yet started offering credit in full-faith to ventures of an unconventional nature.

The good news is that digital NBFCs are willing to support this generation of businesses. The FinTech industry has been increasingly lending to e-commerce companies, digital marketing organisations and other projects that use technology innovatively. Thus, all of this encourages progress and allows talented entrepreneurs to contribute to the Make in India initiative.

Prepayment penalties: Nobody wants to be debt-ridden. When you take a personal or business loan, you also wish to pay it back as soon as possible. However, the lending policies of traditional sources of finance in India have been such that borrowers are penalised if they repay early. The banks earn through interest paid each month, and to maximise this, they grant loans for longer tenures. If you have windfall gains in business and want to pay off your debt early, you may be charged at least 5% of the loan amount as penalty. That may be quite disappointing for an astute businessperson.

The new-age NBFCs have eliminated this trouble. There are no preclosure penalties when you get business loan from a digitally operating FinTech lender. What is more, their flexible repayment options give you the liberty to pay without straining your business operations or affecting your personal funds.

If the case for borrowing from a FinTech company looks convincing and positive, you can be the next business to get a loan from Capital Float. With a set of thoughtfully segregated loan products, we will be happy to support your business in its journey towards higher levels of growth. To know more about how the online NBFC business loans in India can help you, visit our website www.capitalfloat.com.

Oct 24, 2018

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We want to be in 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months: Gaurav Hinduja & Sashank Rishyasringa – Business Standard

Written by Alnoor Peermohamed

Bengaluru-based startup Capital Float, which lends to small and medium enterprises (SMEs), plans to grow its presence from 40 cities to a 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months. While sellers on e-commerce platforms make up a large chunk of whom the company lends to, it says it will focus more on tier 2 and tier 3 businesses, which might be solely offline but have the potential to grow massively. Gaurav Hinduja and Sashank Rishyasringa, founders of Capital Floatalk to Alnoor Peermohamed in the company’s plans. Edited excerpts:

The e-commerce segment is fairly new and there’s bound to be volatility. How do you think that might impact your business?

Hinduja: E-commerce merchants are the core to what we do and it’s an important vertical, but we’ve also diversified outside.

We do loans to a lot traditional SMEs — brick and mortar, manufacturing and service type of organisations because that segment is 30-40 million, whereas e-commerce is 100-200 thousand. I think almost all sellers sell on all marketplaces. And when we underwrite the business, we look at a combination of things. Sales across marketplaces, and how does that look across his offline sales as well, because a lot of sell offline. We look at a holistic view of the business before we actually decide to give the person a loan.

Data on sellers is harder to come by in the offline world. How are you tackling that?

Rishyasringa: You’ll be surprised as to how much data is available on any business in India and that’s very much a big part of the IP we’ve built since the early days. I think what we’ve been able to do is build a lot of pipes for data sources such as Aadhaar, NSDL, and a whole host of other government and legal databases.

The borrower is also able to give us access to a lot of data that we can then use in deciding what terms and what kind of loan to give them. For example, social media is a very interesting input that we consider in our underwriting model.

On the online piece, yes there is some additional data which helps with the speed of lending. So today we give real time approvals to e-commerce sellers in 10 to 15 minutes.

What is your primary source of raising capital?

Hinduja: Like most financial institutions we obviously raise equity right, and we have raised a little over Rs 100 crore from some of the best VCs, but also we have raised debt.

What are your sort of default rates? How are you working to keep them low?

Hinduja: Ironically, a lot of the bank’s defaulters are not coming from the SME sector. They’re actually coming from large borrowers. A lot of what we do is the underwriting, through different data, and we do that to keep our credit costs, which are defaults, et cetera, really low.

Today they are very low, I’d say 80-90 per cent better than any NBFC that lends to SMEs out there. That said, it is still early days. This is a lending business at the end of the day, there are going to be defaults.

What do you think will happen when guys like Alibaba increase their focus in India? Where do you fit in?

Rishyasringa: B2B e-commerce has the potential to be far larger than B2C e-commerce in India. And we think what Alibaba has been able to achieve in China and in India with its SME base for exporters and importers is tremendous.

We are partners with Alibaba. You can infer from that, that we’re already active in the space and its part of our strategy.

How is this partnership going to work?

Hinduja: They’re going to look at us to help get more SMEs to become active Alibaba users. But at the same time a lot of their SME merchant base will require financing, whether it’s for domestic transactions, or cross border transactions. They will look at a financer that really has the speed and the agility to meet the SMEs requirements in that sense.

What are your growth plans?

Hinduja: We want to be in 100 cities in the next 12 to 18 months and obviously a lot of that growth is going to come from tier 2 and tier 3 towns. Because banks really don’t have a presence there.

While people and SMEs in the top 8-10 cities can still access a bank branch, bank branch penetration in those tier 2 tier 3 towns is almost negligible. I think that’s where we’ll see a lot of growth and through the make in India and e-commerce stuff you’ll see a lot of business growth in those cities as well.

What sort of regulatory hurdles do you see yourselves having to cross?

Rishyasringa: Actually in the financial services space I think we’ve got a very proactive regulator and what you’re seeing in these payment banks, small finance banks, e-KYC, I think these are all steps in the right direction and we obviously hope that we continue to see these steps.

News piece sourced from Business Standard. Read the full piece here.

Oct 24, 2018