Revised GST Rates – with effect from 25 January 2018

The 25th GST Council was held on 18 January 2018, and the rates of 29 goods and 53 services were reduced to lower tax slabs. These revised rates came into effect on 25 January. Other highlights of the panel included the decision to divide between the Centre and State, collections worth ₹35,000 crores from the Integrated Goods and Services Tax. The proposal to bring petroleum and diesel products under the ambit of GST is likely to be considered in the next meeting.

Here are the key goods and services that have been lowered or raised into new GST slabs.  

Good/Service Present GST Rates Revised GST Rates
Diamonds & precious stones 3% 0.25%
Articles of straw, esparto or other plaiting materials, Velvet fabric 12% 5%
LPG supplied to household domestic consumers, Raw materials and consumables needed for launch vehicles, satellites and payloads, Tamarind kernel powder, Mehendi paste in cones, Tailoring services, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products, job-work services for manufacture of leather goods and footwear 18% 5%
Sugar boiled confectionery, Drinking water packed in 20 litre bottles, Biodiesel, Drip irrigation system including laterals & sprinklers, Mechanical sprayer, Fertilizer grade Phosphoric acid, Bamboo wood building joinery, Transportation of petroleum crude and petroleum products with ITC credit, Metro and monorail projects, Common effluent treatment plants services for treatment of effluents, Mining or exploration services of petroleum crude and natural gas and for drilling services in respect of the said goods 18% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles(other than medium & large cars and SUVs) with a condition than no ITC is availed 28% 12%
Old and used motor vehicles [medium and large cars and SUVs] with a condition that No ITC is availed, Public transport buses that run on biofuel, Services by way of admission to theme parks, water parks, joy rides, merry-go-rounds, go-karting and ballet 28% 18%
Small housekeeping service providers, notified under section 9 (5) of GST Act, who provide housekeeping service through ECO,  without availing ITC nil 5%
Actionable claim in the form of chance to win in betting and gambling including horse racing nil 28%
Rice bran(other than de-oiled rice bran) 0% 5%
Cigarette filter rods 12% 18%

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Changes in the GST Taxation System – with effect from 15 November 2017

Composition Scheme Changes

  • GST rate at 1% for manufacturers and traders
  • Composition scheme limit to be extended to ₹1.5 crore
  • Composition tax of 1% on turnover of taxable goods
  • Interstate sales are not permissible for composition dealers. Input tax benefit not allowed.

GST Filing Extensions

GSTR form Previous Due Date Revised Due Date
GSTR-5 (for Non-Residents) Before 20th August 2017 or & days from date of registration 15th December 2017
GSTR-4 (for Composition Dealers) 18th October 2017 24th December 2017
GSTR-6 (for Input Service Distributors) 13th August 2017 31st December 2017
ITC-04 (for the quarter of July-September) 25th October 2017 31st December 2017
TRAN-1 30th September 2017 31st December 2017

Taxpayer Relief Measures

  • Reduced Late Fee: For delay in the filing of NIL returns, late fee will be reduced from ₹200 per day to ₹20 per day.
  • Credit of Late Fee: For filing of GSTR-3B for the months of July, August and September, late fee has been waived. Any late fee paid will be credited back in Electronic Cash Ledger under ‘Tax’ and can be utilized for GST payments.
  • Manual filing for ‘Advance Ruling’ to be introduced
  • Export of services to Nepal and Bhutan are now exempt from GST. Input tax credit, if paid, can be claimed for refund.
  • Taxpayers with turnover less than ₹1 crore should file invoices every month, while those with turnover greater than ₹1 crore should file invoices every quarter.

Revised GST Rates for 178 Goods and Services

Goods/Services Present GST Rates Revised GST Rates
Guar meal, Khandsari sugar, Dried or frozen vegetables, Uranium ore concentrate, Hop cones, Unworked coconut shells 5% Nil
Desiccated coconut, Idli Dosa Batter, Coir products, Fly ash bricks, Worn clothes or rags, Fishing hooks, Leather or chamois after tanning or crusting, Nets of textile material, Restaurants (non-Ac) 12% 5%
Potato flour, Chutney powder, Sulphur recovered as by-product in refining of crude oil, Specified parts of aircraft, Scientific and technical apparatus, Computer software and accessories, Restaurants (AC) 18% 5%
Condensed milk, Diabetic foods, Refined sugar, Medicinal grade oxygen, Printing, writing and drawing inks, Pasta, Curry paste, Mayonnaise and salad dressings, Mixed seasoning, Parts of agricultural & sewing machinery, Bamboo and cane furniture, Frames and mountings for spectacles, Hand bags and shopping bags of cotton and jute 18% 12%
Wet grinders, Tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles 28% 12%
Chewing gum, Chocolates, Preparation of facial make-up, Preparations for oral hygiene, Toothpaste, Shaving and after-shave items, Shampoo, Deodorants, Detergents, Granite and marble, Handmade furniture, Electric switches, Watches, Sanitary ware, Cases, Cutlery, Refrigerators, Flavoured drinks, Water heaters, Fire extinguishers, Printers, Automatic goods vending machine, Transmission shafts and cranks, Fork-lift trucks, Self-propelled bulldozers, Batteries, Static converters, Vacuum cleaners, Cameras and projectors, Microscopes, Musical instruments 28% 18%

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Oct 24, 2018

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5 reasons to pay EMIs/Credit Card payments on time

Timely payment of EMIs or credit card bills is an essential aspect of taking charge of your financial life. Very often, people miss their bill payments because of their busy schedules. Making on-time bill payments a priority will lead to many benefits and will keep you out of debt traps.

Here are five reasons to pay your EMIs or credit card payments on time:

  • Good credit standing: Making timely payments of EMIs or credit card bills will ensure that your credit history remains positive. A good credit score makes you creditworthy. Having a high credit score will enable you to avail quick, formal finance to address your needs in the future.
  • Avail loans easily: If you have a high credit score, banks or financial institutions won’t hesitate to sanction your loans. You can even get higher loan amounts with low-interest rates.
  • Save on fines: You may avoid the penalty or late payment fee that banks charge by paying the EMIs or credit card bills on time. This helps avoid increasing your financial burden.
  • Save money: When you pay your EMIs or credit card bills on time, you save more as the interest on the outstanding amount does not increase. Lenders may charge high interest on delayed repayments.
  • Keep the monthly payments low: When you miss your bill payment for a month, you will need to pay it the following month. So, the amount to be paid in the next month will increase. Your next payment will include two installments and also the penalty charge, thereby compounding the owable amount. 

Late payments can affect the financial position of people adversely. Make it a habit to pay all your dues on time. It will not only reduce your stress level but also help you avail of all the benefits mentioned above.

Oct 24, 2018

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Convenient Supply Chain Financing Creates Resiliency In The System

Supply chain finance is an important but often underrated aspect of supply chain management. At its core, supply chain management is the management of the flow of material / services, data and money through a network of assets from the point of origin to the point of final consumption (and back). Natural disasters, geo-political crisis and financial crisis faced by the world over the past decade have forced companies to move away from only optimizing their supply chains to making them more resilient. For a supply chain to be truly resilient, all risks associated with the asset base managing the flow (i.e. the material & services, data and money) must be negotiated intelligently, keeping in mind that each one represents a point of failure or a point of opportunity.

Industries are habituated to ignore the significance of supply chain financing. While there has been a lot of collaboration between different constituents of supply chains, they usually center on inventory. However inventory and finance are intrinsically linked; increased players in the supply chain machinery is directly proportionate to the increased complexity in the financing of the process. This is especially true in a country like India, where the number of intermediaries, in many cases outnumbering the actual value addition points, poses a complex problem from the paradigm of supply chain finance and more importantly supply chain resiliency.

As with anything in a complex supply chain, the bulk of the power resides in a few constituents (maybe the retailer or the manufacturer depending upon the specifics of the value chain). These companies understandably look out for their own interests especially when it comes to supply chain finance. Though concepts like JIT (just in time) inventory and quick turnaround times from order-to-delivery have reduced inventory levels held drastically, most companies still hold onto the traditional 30-45-60 day of credit terms with their suppliers. This puts incredible financial stress on the supplier which in the worst case manifests in poor quality of supply. In the long run, this increases the total cost of ownership for the company, i.e. investment in more stringent QC processes, returns, disruption to the manufacturing process, supplier switching costs etc. Applying the same principles of collaborative thinking to supply chain finance will not only make the overall chain more resilient but also optimize the flows and pass on efficiencies in the long run to the end consumer.

In today’s business environment where “share holder value” is no longer a buzz word but the focus of every corporate board of directors, it might be wishful thinking to expect companies to share their margins or reduce days of credit to suppliers in the interest of collaboration. This is where a third party financial institution plays an important role. By providing liquidity to the supplier on the basis of the credit umbrella provided by the bigger company, the addition of the third party financial institution creates a win-win across all stakeholders involved. This is even more critical in the case of small and medium sized enterprises, which at this point are forced to spend only a fraction of their efforts on innovation and growth.

While some large corporates do have some form of supplier financing initiatives through tie ups with Banks and NBFCs, in most cases the coverage of the initiatives are limited (to some marquee suppliers) and in a larger amount of cases are a generic form of receivable financing based on existing credit policies of the financial institutions, which are out of sync with business realities. It is imperative for large corporates to have a supplier financing initiative for all their suppliers, especially the SMEs to manage their financial risks. In turn it is imperative for the financial institution to have a tailored product which reflects the operating realities of the industry and also the specificity of the supply chain. Collaboration of all three stakeholders, i.e. the large corporate, SME supplier and financial institution will be critical to ensuring a sustainable supply chain finance program.

We live in an interconnected world; therefore large corporates have the responsibility to ensure that their SME suppliers have access to finance, if they truly want to make their supply chains resilient.

Prashant Adhurty

Prashant has 11 years of experience in business strategy and operations, with specific expertise in the areas of project management, supply chain management and business process formulation , across the retail sector, United Nations system & international organizations, telecommunications & high technology, oil & gas and 3rd party logistics. He has successfully managed and delivered projects for clients based out of Europe, the USA, Africa and India.
At Capital Float, Prashant heads Business Development for Supply Chain Financing.

Oct 24, 2018