Repay with ease using Paytm

As India’s leading digital lender, we are always mindful of what’s most important for us: our customers. All Capital Float’s finance solutions can be customized based on the nature of your business and the rate of cash flows, among other things. Our online loan application process ensures that you can avail a loan anytime, anywhere with minimal documents. Flexible repayment terms through offline and online channels are facilitated to ensure that you have a seamless financing experience with Capital Float, through and through.

With the added ease that digital wallets provide, we have collaborated with Paytm to set up yet another payment option for your convenience. EMI payment can now be done through your Paytm wallet in two ways: directly through the Paytm app or from your Paytm wallet via the Capital Float mobile app.

Here are the steps for a successful EMI transaction using your Paytm wallet.

1. Via the Paytm Mobile App

Capital Flo

Step 1: Login to the Paytm app on your smartphone. Under the ‘Recharge/Pay for’ section, click on Loans

Step 2: From the list of financial lenders listed, choose Capital Float

Step 3: On the page ‘Pay Your Loan EMI’, enter your Loan Account Number (LAN) and click on Get Payable Amount.

Step 4: Your due EMI will be automatically generated on the next screen. Click on ‘Proceed to Pay’ to make the payment.

 

2. Via the Capital Float App

Capital Flo

Step 1: Open the Capital Float app, and Login by entering your registered phone number or email ID & password. You can also Login via Google if you had registered with a Gmail email address.

Step 2: Under the Loans tab, click on the option ‘Repay’. If your EMI payment is overdue, check the Updates tab for Overdue and select ‘Pay Now’.

Step 3: The Overdue Amount will be shown. If you select Upcoming Amount only, then this will get preselected. You can enter a lesser amount under ‘Make Payment of’ as well.

Step 4: Choose the option ‘Pay from your Paytm wallet’ and login using your registered mobile number and a 6-digit OTP code.

Step 5: Recharge using debit card/credit card/net banking or utilize the available balance in your Paytm wallet to complete the transaction.

Note: Capital Float accepts EMI payments via Paytm ONLY through the above mentioned methods. A Capital Float representative will NOT ask you to make loan payments to other mobile numbers. In case you receive such a request, please contact us at 1800 419 0999 or email us at myloan@capitalfloat.com

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Implications of GST on Manufacturing

GST — the unified tax system that is set to revolutionize indirect taxation in India— is finally here. Some of its key proposed advantages are streamlining of tax payments, reduction in tax frauds, and ease of doing business. Here is a look at how these will play out in the manufacturing domain.

Make In India & Manufacturing

The manufacturing sector in India contributes a mere 16% to the overall GDP. However, the potential to make this a high-growth and high-GDP sector is huge. The “Make in India” campaign by Prime Minister Narendra Modi makes this possibility real, by giving impetus to the sector. Furthermore, PwC estimates that India will become the fifth largest manufacturing country in the world by the end of 2020. It would be interesting to know how the Goods and Services Tax or GST impacts this roadmap.

Impact of GST on Manufacturing

GST is one of the key policy changes that will have a direct impact on manufacturing establishments. So far, the existing complex tax structure has been a dampener, resulting in the slow growth of the sector. GST is expected to liberate the sector by unifying tax regimes across states.

Overall, GST is expected to have a positive impact and boost manufacturing.  Here is why:

  • Removal of multiple valuations will create simplification: The old tax regime subjects manufactured goods to excise duty, which is calculated differently in different states. While some states calculate excise duty based on transaction value, others calculate it based on quantity. Most manufactured goods’ excise duty is currently considered on MRP valuation. This creates great confusion in valuation methods. GST will usher in an era of transaction-based valuation, making calculation of tax much simpler for the manufacturer.
  • Entry tax subsummation will reduce cost of production: The subsuming of the entry tax for inter-state transfers is a key reason for reducing cost of goods and services. For example, a supplier of cement from Maharashtra to Karnataka was earlier required to pay entry tax when the supply crossed the interstate border. For Karnataka, the entry tax rate was 5% of the value of the goods. The supplier would pass on this additional cost to the customer, resulting in increase in selling price. With entry tax being subsumed, the supplier need not pay the entry tax rate amount and consequently, not charge the customer this amount either.
  • Improved cash flows: Under the new tax laws, manufacturers can claim input tax credit on input goods, which seems to be a positive sign for cash flow. SMEs are keenly observing the time difference between input tax credit and the credit being available.
  • Single registration process will provide ease of registration: The old regime required manufacturers to register each manufacturing facility separately, even those in the same state. GST will simplify the plant registration process by allowing single registration for all manufacturing entities within the same state. Previously, if a brick manufacturer had factories in Bangalore, Hubli and Dharwad, each unit had to be registered separately. Under GST, all of these factories would be jointly registered under the state of Karnataka. Of course, different state-entities will require separate registrations under GST too.
  • Removal of cascading will lead to lower cost-to-consumer: The old tax regime does not allow manufacturers to claim tax credit on inter-state transaction taxes such as octroi, central sales tax, entry tax etc. This results in cascading of taxes—an extra cost to the manufacturing company. Manufacturers end up passing on these extra costs to the consumer. The unified GST regime will eliminate multiple taxes and thus lower cost of production; this, in turn, will mean lower pricing for the consumer. For example, prior to 1 July 2017, SMEs in manufacturing used to pay Excise Duty, Central State Tax and sometimes VAT too at 12.5%, 2% and 5.5% respectively. With GST in effect, they are required to pay 18% in taxes.
  • Restructuring of supply chain: To align with the GST law, businesses will be required to realign their supply chains. However, this is a blessing in disguise. Till date, most supply chain structuring has been designed around how to manage tax regimes. With a single tax regime, this will change, and supply chain structures will focus on driving business efficiencies. An example is that of warehousing. The old regime demands that warehouse management be based on arbitrage between varying VAT rates across states. This is expected to change to bring in economic efficiencies and more customer-centricity going ahead.

Manufacturers, however, are concerned about the following aspects:

  • Increase in immediate working capital requirements: Branch transfers and depo transfers will be treated as taxable under GST; IGST will be applicable on these transfers. This increases the requirement for immediate working capital. Another reason for increased working capital requirements is that the receipt of advance is taxable as per GST rules. Also, stock transfers are treated as “supply” and hence are taxable under the GST regime.
  • More stringent and elaborate transaction management: GST aims to achieve better tax compliance. To make this possible, manufacturers must work towards streamlining existing transactions; this means additional resources and costs. For example, under GST, credit in respect to an invoice can be taken only up to one year of the invoice date. Also, the provision of reverse charge means that the liability to pay tax falls on the recipient of goods/services instead of the supplier. The payment of reverse charge is dependent on the time of supply (30 days from the date of issue of invoice by the supplier in case of goods and 60 days for services).These changes will require manufacturers to carefully assess and track their supply processes, especially the timelines. This may mean hiring a better skilled compliance workforce, and better systems and software. More legal considerations will also mean more costs.
  • Lack of clarity on local exemptions: Despite GST being proposed as a unifying platform for indirect tax, all the components for manufacturing are not yet clear. One such area is localized area-based exemptions. The old structure provides certain exemptions for certain goods in specific states (for example the North East or hilly states). Under GST, most of these exemptions are likely to be removed, resulting in a negative cost-impact on these manufacturers. Such companies must reassess their financial position in view of such likely changes.

Overall, one can say that the impact of GST on the manufacturing sector is positive. It provides a unique opportunity to streamline business operations to become more compliance and profitability-oriented, rather than tax-oriented. It puts power in the hands of business leaders to bring about positive change and steer their enterprises on a growth path, powered by GST-compliance.

Read more of our content on GST by clicking here.

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Oct 24, 2018

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How to Determine Your Working Capital Needs

The availability of working capital is probably the most critical aspect of running a business smoothly and successfully. Also known as the current capital, working capital basically refers to the cash available with an organization for managing its daily operations and is calculated by simply deducting the current liabilities of a business from its current assets.

Assets that can be easily converted into cash within a year or a business cycle are termed as current assets and include cash, accounts receivables, inventories and short-term prepaid expenses. Similarly, current liabilities are the ones that a business needs to pay off within a year or one business cycle and includes accounts payable, accrued liabilities, accrued income taxes and dividends payable.

If current assets are greater than current liabilities, the business has a positive working capital situation or extra cash to meet unexpected expenses. Conversely, if the current liabilities are more than the current assets, the business is said to have negative working capital and needs to take working capital business loans.

Adequate cash availability also allows a business to take care of newer opportunities that require quick infusion of funds. However, not all businesses have access to adequate funds to carry out their operations smoothly and often need working capital loans.

Working Capital: Need and Importance

Every business needs to maintain some working capital to continue its operations smoothly. The amount of liquid funds available with a business is a measure of its ability to meet its short-term obligations. It is also a reflection of a company’s operational efficiency. Here are some reasons why working capital is essential:

Smooth Running of Business: Funds are needed for the smooth working of day-to-day operations and spending on the purchase of raw materials, overhead expenses and payment of wages and salaries. Working capital enables an uninterrupted flow of production or provision of services.

Goodwill: Sufficient cash with a business means it is capable of making prompt and timely payments, which in turn enhances its goodwill.

Easy Loans: Banks and financial institutions prefer to lend to organizations with adequate working capital.

Ability to Deal with Unexpected Expenses: Adequate availability of funds prepares a business to meet any unexpected expenses or situations.

Working capital is often used to judge the financial health of a business. A positive working capital situation indicates that a business is capable of paying off all its short-term debts, operating expenses and salaries with some extra amount remaining for reinvestment. In contrast, negative working capital is a cause for concern. It hints that the business may not be able to pay off its creditors.

Need for Working Capital Finance

Many businesses do not have sufficient cash in hand or liquid assets like money in the current account to meet their daily operational expenses. This is where working capital finance comes to their rescue. Small retailers or merchants typically require capital to fund seasonal inventory buildup. Also, businesses that do not have stable revenues through the year may still need to maintain a specific amount of inventory to fulfill any sudden increase in demand for their products. Such units often require a working capital loan to pay wages or meet other expenses during lean periods or when they are servicing an order, and the receivables would become due only after order fulfilment.

A working capital business loan is a short-term finance option that is generally repaid in the period when sales are high and the company has surplus cash. A major benefit of such credit is that its terms is short, which allows a business to maintain full control of its operations. Such loans need to be sanctioned quickly, without a lengthy approval process. Working capital funding can be secured or unsecured, depending on the financial product or lender.

Determining Your Working Capital Needs

The proper assessment of working capital needs is an important part of efficient financial planning. It allows a business to plan well and arrange the necessary funds on time to ensure smooth functioning of daily operations. The amount of current or working capital required by a business may vary. It is dependent on the operating cycle, or the amount needed to pay suppliers, the amount of inventory held and the time taken to collect cash from customers. Also, this may change with changes in demand for its products and services.

The working capital requirements of a business can be calculated by subtracting the accounts payable from the sum of the inventories and accounts receivables. Businesses need to fill the working capital gap by using internally generated profits or external borrowings or a combination of the two.

In case of new units or startups, working capital refers to the amount of money to be borrowed to keep operations going until the business starts generating adequate revenues to cover its operational expenses. Calculating the amount required to carry on business in the initial few months when there are no or very little revenues challenging and often leads to businesses borrowing too much or too little. A business should look towards raising working capital loans that have a prepayment option, or the option to repay the loan before the term is over.

Raising Working Capital Business Loans

Financial institutions use two ratios – the current ratio and the quick ratio – to measure the financial health or liquidity of a business. The current ratio is obtained by dividing the value of current assets by the value of current liabilities. A ratio above one means the current assets are more than liabilities, which is viewed positively. The quick ratio measures the proportion of short term liquidity (current assets minus inventory) to the current liabilities of a business. It gives a good idea of the company’s ability to meet short-term expenses quickly.

Working capital business loans are granted after assessing a company’s liquidity and working capital needs.

Oct 24, 2018

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What is UBL and how we underwrite it

The SME sector in India is large and burgeoning. It contributes 45% of the industrial output and 40% of exports, and employs over 40 million people. With rapid economic growth and the impetus being given by the Government, this sector is expected to grow at a phenomenal pace, from accounting for 15% of India’s GDP in 2015 to 22% in 2018.

SMEs need funding

Despite its enviable growth, the smaller merchants and retailers face chronic cash shortage. Traditional banking offers more challenges than solutions to such enterprises. They are faced with long approval periods, demands of collateral, unsurmountable eligibility criteria and loan terms that are unsuitable to address short-term cash flow issues.

Unsecured Loans Provide the Relief

This is where unsecured loans come to their rescue. These are typically shorter-term loans that do not require collateral or guarantors. Some financial solutions are specifically designed to aid SMEs to address their working capital needs or expand their existing business. SMEs often work with limited resources and may find it challenging to pledge collateral to secure a loan. Unsecured business loans prove to be highly beneficial in this regard.

The Greatest Challenge to Overcome

Since unsecured loans by definition have no collateral to back them, a stringent underwriting process needs to be in place to ascertains the applicant’s intent and ability to repay the loan. The loan underwriting process must include the collation and verification of all the data provided by the applicant. This information is analyzed to determine the financial health of the enterprise and the creditworthiness of the individuals most closely associated with the business.

Relying on Cutting-Edge Technology

At Capital Float, we deploy cutting-edge technology to ensure that the process of loan approval is smooth, seamless and swift. This data driven process begins with the loan seeker filing an online application and uploading/giving access to all the relevant documents, including the company’s ITR, sales figures, balance sheet and cash flow statements. Our systems pull the data automatically from various external sources and populate the relevant fields. Capital Float lays specific importance to digital data available in the eco system e.g.; telly ledgers and purchase ledgers.

Apart from the documents provided, weightage is given to company ratings provided by rating agencies like CRISIL and ICRA. The bureau data is used extensively which goes beyond CIBIL scores and looks at hundreds of variables which might predict customer behavior.

The system collates all this information and draws up algorithm-based scores for each business. This initial screening process has no human intervention, since the technology is intelligent enough to identify a risky borrower and reject an application that does not meet the minimum criteria. All this is done in a matter of five minutes; whereas traditional banking could take anywhere between one to three months to decision a loan.

Once an application clears the first screening, experts from Capital Float visits the company’s premises, which could be the registered office or the factory. The experts spend time to understand the business model, the processes, the production capacity and the utilization of existing resources to gain a deeper insight into the health of the enterprise.

These inputs are also entered into the system, which uses powerful algorithms to analyze all the data being collated. These algorithms aid credit managers to take a more informed decision regarding loan approvals.

Thus, with the help of ground-breaking technology, Capital Float is able to approve loans in less than a week, while also ensuring NPAs remain exceptionally low.

Oct 24, 2018