7 TIPS TO SAVE MONEY WHILE MANAGING PERSONAL FINANCES

In today’s world, saving money is of the utmost importance. If you are stressed about how to save money, then you are not the only one in this regard. Financial planning sounds easier than to practice. Even though it may be more exciting to spend money, you should try to practice saving for contingencies, as the future cannot be predicted and is uncertain.

Why is saving money essential?

Saving money can help you to become financially independent, providing you with security in the face of emergencies. Financial planning is necessary to set aside money for the family’s needs, such as the education of children, marriage expenses, healthcare expenses, planning for significant life events, retirement, etc. Saving money is an effective financial practice and a lifestyle choice with several proven benefits.

7 tips to save money

Though there are several ways to save money, you could consider implementing these seven tips:

  • Awareness: Being aware is one of the most critical factors. If you are aware of your finances and spending habits, you will be able to consciously set more money aside.  
  • Prepare a budget: Begin by identifying your fixed and flexible expenses. This will help you evaluate how much of your corpus is depleted by unnecessary expenditure. After this, you can prepare a budget on a weekly or monthly basis by setting expenditure limits. This will help you pay your bills while simultaneously creating a pool of savings. You can make a budget on a weekly or monthly basis (based on your preference) with spending limits clearly defined. This budget may help you in saving extra money and restricting unnecessary expenditures.
  • Curb the spendthrift in you: Many people aren’t always conscious of how lavishly they spend money on unimportant things. Tracking expenses will help you maintain a close vigil on expenses and keep the spendthrift within under control.
  • Create an emergency fund: While facing emergencies, financial support in the form of insurance or loans may not be immediately available or they may not cover the need of the hour. At such times, savings come in handy to address the contingency. Therefore, make sure you set aside a fund for unforeseen expenses.
  • Sell things you no longer use: There are many things we buy, and after some time, do not use any more. These items can be sold to generate funds.
  • Savings calculator: Various types of savings calculators can be found online. These can be used to calculate the amount one can save over a given period of time. Using these calculators could encourage the habit of saving.
  • Switch to a personal finance money management app: Spends tracking and budgeting can be made easy with personal finance management apps. Walnut is one of the most loved and rated apps in the market with over 10 million downloads. Use this app to unlock the financial planner in you. 

It is necessary to save money, as it provides security, financial independence, and reduces stress. Get started on your journey of personal financial planning to achieve peace of mind and money in the bank for when you need it.

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Capital Float secures $13 million in funding to give loans to small businesses – YourStory

Written by Jubin Mehta

Capital Float is a digital finance company that provides working capital loans to underserved small business in India via a technology-led loan origination and credit underwriting platform. The Bangalore based company today announced that it has raised $13 Million in Series A financing to support the company’s rapid growth. The round was led by SAIF Partners and Sequoia Capital, with participation from existing investor Aspada.

Founded in 2013, Capital Float has created a proprietary technology platform to evaluate the financial health of SMEs and efficiently deliver working capital to a segment that is underserved by traditional banks. Businesses can apply online and get funds in less than 7 days (see how it works). The company currently lends to e-commerce merchants, small manufacturers, and B2B service providers across major cities. The company has been founded by Stanford MBAs Sashank Rishyasringa and Gaurav Hinduja and is a registered Non-Banking Finance Company (NBFC). Along with the headquarter in Bangalore, Capital Float has offices in New Delhi and Mumbai.

To date, the Capital Float platform has delivered nearly Rs. 40 Crore in loans to SMEs across 10+ cities in India. The company claims to have achieved record results in 2014 and saw a 10x increase in online applications, particularly in the e-commerce market where it has partnered with leading marketplaces such as Snapdeal, Flipkart, Amazon, PayTM and Myntra to finance small merchants selling online.

This round of funding will help expand Capital Float’s technology, enabling it to scale up nationally and launch new loan products. The company had raised a $4 Million seed round in mid-2014 from Aspada and SAIF, bringing the total capital raised thus far to Rs. 100 Crore in this fiscal.

“We started Capital Float with the belief that technology and data would be the key drivers in cracking SME financing in India,” said co-founders Gaurav Hinduja and Sashank Rishyasringa. “Over the past year, we’ve focused on building the platform to deliver what our customers want above all else – flexible and ultra-convenient access to finance that can scale with their business. By leveraging alternative data in our underwriting model, we are increasingly able to not only make faster decisions but also lend to emerging business models. We are very excited to partner with SAIF, Sequoia, and Aspada, and truly believe that we now have a world-class set of investors to propel us towards this vision.”

News piece sourced from YourStory. Read the full piece here

Oct 24, 2018

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Old May Not Always Be Gold

Like most college friends, Ankit, Murthy and Kumanan lost touch with each other soon after graduating. Unlike most friends who lose touch with each other, they ran into each other while vacationing in the same resort at the same time to celebrate new years’ eve. While their career paths had diverged 15 years out of college, they were soon reminiscing the good old days with an equally old bottle of scotch. After rewinding and replaying the past a few times, the conversation caught up with time and they started talking about work.

After several years of working in a traditional bank, Ankit got bored and joined a new age digital lending company as the head of credit. Kumanan worked at large garment manufacturing units in India, Bangladesh and China. Watching the industry disappear around him, he sensed opportunity and had recently started his own T-shirt design and manufacturing company where he was riding the e-commerce boom and sold most of his inventory online. He had ambitions of starting his own brand soon. Murthy had joined his father’s business and expanded a single department store into a chain across the entire city. He also supplied snacks, beverages, toiletries, cleaning equipment to the largest software company of his city and they were constantly demanding that he supply paper, ink and most other consumables as they grew and expanded.

With the scotch taking care of any and all inhibitions, Murthy and Kumanan’s frustrations surfaced and they started talking about how they love their work, the sense of independence, the sense of control over their destiny but how they absolutely hated dealing with lenders and banks. In their mind, Ankit personified this opaque, insensitive, slow lender and they wanted him to explain why all their past loan and credit card applications had been declined. The barrage of questions targeted at Ankit reached a point where Kumanan even wanted Ankit to explain why his voter ID had the wrong address! Ankit smiled and surprised them by saying he shared their frustration of being unable to provide the right loan to the right person at the right time in his old bank and that he also moved to a new age digital company with the intent to redefine lending in India.

Ankit then asked Kumanan and Murthy to explain how they went about getting a loan and got the answer he expected. Like most business owners, they did not have the time to deal with multiple banks and they used an agent to help them get loans. While they did not particularly like their agents, they did send a guy over to their office to fill forms, collect documents, organize bank discussions and get them their funding without them having to figure out every bank, product and process. In addition, Murthy and Kumanan both had multiple suppliers who they had worked out individual credit terms with. They also admitted that whenever they needed urgent money or large sums that banks would not provide, they got it from local moneylenders at exorbitant terms. It was quite beyond them as to why a bank would think they cannot repay a larger loan when they were clearly taking multiple loans and successfully paying them off.

Ankit explained that traditional banks and lenders had very limited scope for loan officers to think out of the box and act beyond established policies.  Banks did not have significantly different products or processes and ended up providing 2-3 year lump sum loans that were not large enough for Kumanan or Murthy.  They always ended up spending time allocating money across various activities such as expansion, payroll, supplier payments, seasonal demands, online vs offline sales where payment cycles were vastly different. The advantage of Ankit’s new age company was three fold: custom products designed to address specific financial needs of businesses, high speed customer experience with minimal documentation, and low pricing due to product features that enable non-conservative underwriting. Kumanan and Murthy’s curiosity was piqued and they wanted to know more.

Ankit asked Kumanan to imagine a world in which he downloaded a mobile app, added all his suppliers and had a line of credit with standard terms available that he could use to pay any supplier any time. He could pick his repayment period and the payment goes through immediately! No need to haggle with each supplier and the credit line grew with usage and regularity of payments. Since he sold online, he also had the option of picking a tailor made e-commerce loan where repayments were mapped to the payment cycle and a transparent cash flow control mechanism ensured that many more people qualified for affordable large loans. These loans even adjusted themselves for seasonality of his business and he could request top-ups as and when he needed them. Kumanan was very impressed that these products were not restricted to his imagination but were actual products that Ankit was able to provide via his new age digital lending company.

Murthy wanted to know if there was something for folks like him who did not sell online. Ankit told him that instead of taking long term loans that may not be utilized all the time but keep accruing interest, Murthy should opt for an invoice financing loan wherein all his supplies to the large software company could be funded as and when they make a purchase from him. That way, he does not have to plan for their expansion and is confident of the right amount of money at the right time and the right rate. Murthy agreed that while this product did sound interesting, he preferred if somebody came to his office to explain the product and handle the paperwork. Ankit mentioned that his company did not have any “paperwork” since most customer information was collected digitally but he is happy to send over a person to Murthy’s office to help guide him through the product and process. Murthy then wanted to know why he could not get a larger loan and Ankit explained that lenders and banks are happy to lend when they have some visibility into the cash flow of a business. As an example, Ankit’s company had recently launched a merchant cash advance product that collected daily payments directly from the credit card machines that Murthy had in all his stores. Typically, it was a lot easier to qualify for such a loan, there was minimal documentation and there was no need to think about payment due dates!

Having given up hope of ever hitting the gym, Kumanan and Murthy were happy with their new year resolution of trying out custom financial products from new age digital companies and keeping in mind that old may not always be gold!

Tushar Garimalla

Tushar has deep expertise in credit, risk management, portfolio management and analytics gained during his 10-year career with HSBC and Capital One in India and the US. Most recently, he worked on a small business credit card portfolio purchase for Capital One including business development valuations, due diligence, system integration and credit policy development. Tushar graduated from IIT Madras with a B.Tech in Electrical Engineering.

Tushar heads Decision Sciences at Capital Float. 

Oct 24, 2018

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Everybody thought we were nuts – TOI

Written by Shilpa Phadnis. 

When Stanford MBA graduates Sashank Rishyasringa and Gaurav Hinduja started online lending startup Capital Float, it was counter-consensus. All around them they had naysayers, including investors who they had approached early on.

“You guys must be nuts -lending is not a business for you.” “It’s an offline business. You guys have to set up branches.” “Why don’t you guys start an e-commerce or a big data company.” These were some of the comments, recalls Sashank. About the only ones who believed in their idea were their parents.

The two worked with Baba Shiv, professor of marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, to shape their idea of democratizing access to capital. “We wanted small and medium businesses to have access to credit on collateral-free terms.People needed loans against their business health and not against personal property,” Sashank says.

Capital Float started in 2013 and is the trade name of Zen Lefin, a non-banking finance company (NBFC) registered with the RBI.

Sashank, who was passionate about policy and development, was an engagement manager with McKinsey & Co in New York and India before he teamed up with Hinduja to start Capital Float. He graduated in economics from Princeton Uni versity and did an MBA from Stanford. Hinduja was the head of operations at Gokaldas Exports, overseeing one of the country’s largest apparel manufacturers.

 Banks, Sashank says, follow a cookie-cutter approach in assessing SMEs.Their lending policies are restrictive, collateral re quirements are inflexible and disbursements take up to 60 days. There are over 3 crore registered SMEs in the country and around Rs 7 lakh crore of loans have been disbursed through banks to them. But estimates show that the unmet demand is over Rs 9 lakh crore. “We wanted to use tech to bring agility to lending, become a lender as fast and flexible as a family member, but do it in a formal way ,” Sashank says.
Capital Float created flexible credit products that have helped SMEs get out of the clutches of informal sector financiers who charge high interest rates. One of the early customers was a mobile phone vendor from Bhilwara in Rajasthan. “He had pledged his house to get seed capital to start his business. He sold mobile phones on Snapdeal and had a great track record. From Rs 5 lakh a year back, he runs a Rs 50 lakh credit line with us today ,” Sashank says.
Capital Float has partnered with e-commerce marketplaces like Snapdeal, Flipkart, Amazon and Paytm to finance small merchants selling online. “We give an in-principle approval in 10-15 minutes after assessing the credit risk. Borrowers can apply online in minutes, select desired repayment terms and receive funds in their bank accounts in seven days with minimal hassle. We want to benchmark lending to the ecommerce experience,” Sashank says.
The company uses proprietary algorithms to check fraud and repayment history , and uses psychometrics to assess entrepreneurs’ payment ability . “We have taken the human bias out of financing and lowered the cost of lending,” Sashank says.

Now, with Rs 200 crore of loans disbursed, and $17 million raised from investors including SAIF Partners and Aspada, the early scepticism around their venture has more or less vanished.

News piece sourced from the Times of India. Read the original article here

Oct 24, 2018